Institute policies, rules & regulations

Discipline and suspension

See also Involuntary Medical Withdrawal below.

I. General Discipline Policy

An Overview

  1. The sections that follow discuss the discipline policies of the Institute in detail. This section summarizes those policies, showing the areas of jurisdiction and the levels of appeal. The major focus in this document is on the procedures of the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee, since rules governing general student conduct are discussed in the appropriate student handbooks.
  2. There are two major areas of jurisdiction. The Dean of Students and the Dean's staff handle cases of Non-Academic Misconduct. Individual faculty members and the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee handle cases of Academic Misconduct. All cases of misconduct must be reported to the Dean of Students.
  3. Whenever a student is charged with Non-Academic Misconduct, a disciplinary conference will be scheduled with the Dean of Students.
  4. Any student charged with misconduct is urged to consult with the Dean of Students or the Chairperson of the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee to be informed of the procedures that will be followed and to receive assistance in preparing a defense.

General Policy

  1. The Institute values its reputation for moral leadership as much as its reputation for academic excellence and expects all persons associated with it to maintain this reputation. The Institute's Code of Ethics is simple and direct:  Rose-Hulman expects its students to be responsible adults and to behave at all times with honor and integrity.
  2. All students are expected to abide by this Code and to aid in its enforcement by reporting violations of it.
  3. All Institute administrative officials, faculty, and staff are authorized to enforce the rules and policies of the Institute, are expected to report any violations thereof to the appropriate disciplinary agencies, and will be given full legal support for Institute-related disciplinary actions they may take, on or off campus.
  4. All Institute personnel are urged to be both firm and fair in taking disciplinary action and to do so in consultation with other Institute personnel to avoid illegal actions.

Authority

  1. The Board of Trustees has granted authority to the President of the Institute, in an instance of major disturbance or civil disobedience, to immediately dismiss any student or employee who refuses to leave the scene of the disturbance.
  2. The Board has granted authority to the Faculty to admit and dismiss (suspend) students and the responsibility for all matters involving student discipline.
  3. The Faculty has delegated to the Dean of Students and to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee the authority to dismiss a student, i.e., to impose temporary or permanent suspension.

II: Non-Academic Misconduct

Procedures and Appeals in Cases of Non-Academic Misconduct

  1. Non-Academic Misconduct includes action such as theft, damage, or unauthorized use of Institute property, the disruption of Institute activities on or off campus, disorderly conduct on Institute property or in off-campus fraternity or sorority houses, or violations of Institute regulations as set forth in the Student Handbook.
  2. Jurisdiction in such cases lies with the Dean of Students and instances of such misconduct witnessed by Institute students, faculty, or staff should be reported to the Dean.
  3. Routine problems in the residence halls are handled by the Resident Assistants with the help of professional members of the Student Affairs staff (the Associate Vice President and Dean of Student Affairs or the Associate Dean of Student Affairs). A student may appeal their rulings to the Dean of Students.
  4. Whenever a student is charged with Non-Academic Misconduct, a disciplinary conference will be scheduled with the Dean of Students. If the facts of the case and the penalties to be imposed can be agreed upon, the Dean of Students and the student will sign a Statement of Agreement. This Statement of Agreement, when signed, will constitute a waiver of the right to a hearing or any appeal and an acceptance of the findings and penalties imposed.
  5. If an agreement cannot be reached regarding both the facts of the case and the penalty to be imposed (i.e., a Statement of Agreement has not been signed) and the Dean of Students has determined that suspension from Rose-Hulman may be warranted, then the Dean of Students has the authority to suspend the student or refer the case to the Rules and Discipline Committee.  If the Dean of Students determines that suspension is not an appropriate penalty, and a Statement of Agreement has not been signed, the student must select one of the following three committees to hear the case. The chair of the chosen committee must be contacted within five business days. If none of the chairs are contacted within five business days, then the Dean of Students will issue a ruling which is final.

A hearing by the Student Judicial Council. The Student Judicial Council is a committee of students appointed by the Student Government Association to handle cases of non-academic misconduct. The student may have counsel with him or her (a current student, faculty, or staff member).  Appeal of any sanctions assigned by the Student Judicial Council may be made to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee if initiated within five business days. If the chair of the Rules and Discipline Committee is not contacted within five business days, then the decision of the Student Judicial Council will be final. The appeal to the Rules and Discipline Committee will be final.

A hearing by the Student Affairs Judicial Board.  The Board consists of three members of the professional Student Affairs staff and cannot include the Dean of Students.  In all cases the student may have counsel (a current student, faculty, or staff member) with him or her. Appeals of sanctions assigned by the Student Affairs Judicial Board may be made to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee if initiated within five business days. If the chair of the Rules and Discipline Committee is not contacted within five business days, then the decision of the Student Affairs Judicial Board will be final. The appeal to the Rules and Discipline Committee will be final.

A hearing by the Rules and Discipline Committee.  This is a committee consisting of faculty, staff, and student(s) that hears cases of academic and non-academic misconduct. A Committee decision to suspend may be appealed to the Faculty (see below, "V: Appealing a Suspension to the Faculty"). In all other cases the decision of the Committee is final. An appeal of suspension by the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee decisions must be initiated within five business days by contacting the chair of the Rules and Discipline Committee. If the chair of the Rules and Discipline Committee is not contacted within five business days, then the decision of the Rules and Discipline Committee will be final.

Suspension by the Dean of Students

  1. The Dean is specifically delegated by the Faculty the authority to suspend a student, temporarily or permanently.  The student may appeal such a decision to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee within five business days and should be informed of the right to do so by the Dean.
  2. The Dean may, in consultation with the President of the Institute, invoke summary suspension, barring a student from the Institute immediately.  This may be done when required for the well-being of the student, of other persons, or of the Institute.  The student must comply with this ruling, but may appeal to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee within five business days.
  3. A suspension ruling will be recorded on the student's academic record, unless the case is successfully appealed.  In the case of temporary suspension, this record will be removed at the end of the suspension period.  In the case of permanent suspension it will remain permanently.
  4. The Dean of Students shall report all instances of suspension of a student by the Dean of Students at the next regular Institute Meeting.

III: Academic Misconduct

Actions by an Instructor

  1. Academic Misconduct includes actions such as cheating, plagiarizing, or interfering with the academic progress of other students.
  2. In such cases, the instructor may choose to give reduced credit or no credit for work dishonestly done. This may result in a lowering of the student's course grade.
  3. In addition, the instructor may appropriately levy some further penalty, since the student has violated the Institute Code. Penalties include but are not limited to a warning, (further) lowering the course grade, failure in the course, or turning the case over to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee.
  4. The student has the right to appeal the instructor's decision to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee. The instructor should inform the student of this right of appeal at the time the decision is discussed with the student.
  5. In all instances, the instructor shall submit a brief written report of the case and any action taken to the Dean of Students, the Head of department, and the student. In case a penalty course grade (F, D, or D+) has been assigned, a copy of the report shall also be submitted to the Registrar. These reports will be kept on file until the student graduates, at which time the records will be destroyed. If the case is successfully appealed, the records will be expunged unless the student requests that they be retained. For example, they may be retained in an instance where the course grade has been lowered by the instructor but the Committee subsequently exonerated the student. (See: "Hearings Before the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee: Committee Actions.")

Bringing a Case to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee.

  1. If a student accused of Academic Misconduct feels that an instructor has been unfair or has imposed a penalty too severe the student may appeal to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee.
  2. An instructor, who would like a recommendation of what further penalty should be assessed or would like a penalty that carries the weight of faculty action, may bring the case to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee. This should be done particularly if the instructor feels that the case is serious enough to warrant suspension from the Institute. In turning the case over to the Committee, the instructor should indicate what actions have already taken in the case to aid them in judging what further penalty, if any, is appropriate. The instructor should also be prepared to abide by the recommendation of the Committee, whatever it might be.
  3. If the Dean of Students finds a student involved in more than one instance of Academic Misconduct, the Dean may bring the case to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee.
  4. If a Board of Inquiry finds evidence of Academic Misconduct, it will bring the case to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee. (See Below.)

Board of Inquiry.

  1. A student or any other person connected with the Institute who witnesses Academic Misconduct or who has reason to believe that it has occurred should discuss this with the instructor, the Department Head, or the Dean of Students. They may bring the case directly to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee or, if more investigation is required, they will bring the matter to the Dean of the Faculty who, in consultation with the Dean of Students, will appoint a Board of Inquiry.
  2. This Board will consist of two faculty members who are not members of the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee.
  3. If the Board finds sufficient evidence of misconduct it will bring the case to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee.

IV: Hearings Before the institute Rules and Discipline Committee

Types of Cases Heard by the Committee.

  1. A student may appeal a disciplinary action of an individual instructor.
  2. A student may appeal a suspension ruling by the Dean of Students.
  3. A faculty member, the Dean of Students or other Institute official, or a Board of Inquiry may bring a case against a student.

General Procedures.

  1. The party requesting a hearing shall submit a complete written statement to the Chairperson of the Committee, who will distribute copies to all persons involved and to the Dean of Students. The Chairperson shall invite the other parties involved to submit written rebuttal statements. The Chairperson shall schedule a hearing date and notify all parties, calling the procedures herein described to their attention so that they will be aware of their rights and of the conduct of the hearing. All this shall be accomplished as expeditiously as possible, preferably within a few days.
  2. At the hearing, the student may be accompanied by a faculty member or other person affiliated with the Institute to serve as counsel. The Chairperson shall contact the student prior to the hearing to ascertain whether counsel is required and, if necessary, shall assist in the selection.
  3. The accused has the right to hear all testimony, to examine all evidence, to question all witnesses, to present evidence, and to ask that witnesses be called on the accused's behalf. The student also has the right to remain silent and a decision to do so will not be taken as an admission of guilt.
  4. Witnesses may be requested to appear before the Committee by the Chairperson if desired by the accused, by the person bringing charges, or by the Committee itself.
  5. Any member of the Committee directly involved in the case under consideration or who, for any reason, would be biased in the case, will be excused from the hearing by the Chairperson. The accused and the accused's counsel may petition the Chairperson to excuse a Committee member whom they believe holds a serious bias in the case.
  6. Guilt or innocence in a case shall be determined solely on the merits of that case. The Committee shall not review the previous disciplinary record of the accused before the hearing, or permit such information to be introduced in the hearing, or allow such knowledge as they may have to bias their judgment.
  7. Any finding requires concurrence by a majority of Committee members taking part in the hearing.
  8. A recording of the hearing will be made.
  9. After the close of the hearing, the Committee will privately consider the case, call additional meetings if necessary, reach a decision, notify all parties of the decision, and prepare a brief written statement. Copies of this statement will be sent to all parties and to the Dean of Students to be made a part of the student's personal (not academic) record.
  10. The intent of the foregoing procedures is to make clear to all parties what will occur during the hearing and to safeguard the rights of the accused. It is also their intent to make the hearings as relaxed as possible and to permit free interchange of information between the accused and the Committee in an effort to ascertain the relevant facts of the case.

Committee Actions.

  1. In the case of a student appealing the disciplinary action of an instructor, the Committee may uphold the action of the instructor, may decide that the student is innocent, or may decide that the student has been too severely penalized. Accordingly, it may recommend that the instructor reconsider actions (such as lowering a grade) that have been taken. However, because of the limitations of academic freedom, the Committee is not empowered to change any grade. If the instructor chooses not to follow the Committee's recommendation the Committee will prepare a written statement of its findings for inclusion in the student's personal records. It is hereby specifically noted that, in cases of student appeal, the Committee may not recommend penalties in addition to those which the instructor has already imposed.
  2. In the case of a student appealing a suspension by the Dean of Students, the Committee may affirm the suspension, may mitigate the suspension (changing permanent suspension to temporary suspension or reducing the terms of suspension), or may remove the suspension and recommend that the Dean substitute other penalties or that no penalties be assessed. The Committee may not levy additional penalties. The Committee is not empowered to review other disciplinary actions of the Dean, such as removing a student from the Residence Halls, which may be appealed to the President of the Institute.
  3. In the case of a hearing initiated against a student, if the Committee finds the student innocent it may recommend, but cannot require, that any penalties previously assessed be removed. Its report shall include its determination of innocence and shall direct that all written reports of the case be expunged from the student's personal record unless the student requests that they be retained. For example, they may be retained in an instance where a course grade has been lowered by the instructor but the Committee subsequently exonerated the student.
  4. In the case of a hearing initiated against a student, if the Committee renders a finding of guilty, the Dean of Students will then review the student's previous disciplinary record, if any, to aid the Committee in its decision as to the penalty. Penalty options include, but are not limited to, a reprimand, a recommendation to the instructor that the student's grade be lowered or that the student be failed in the course, suspension of the student from extra-curricular activities, a referral of the case to civil authorities, or suspension of the student from the Institute. The Committee will not seek to devise 'novel' penalties or forms of restitution unless they seem clearly appropriate and do not constitute 'cruel and unusual punishment'.
  5. A decision to suspend may be appealed to the Faculty. (See below.) In all other cases, the decision of the Committee is final; that is, no further appeal is permitted by the student and no penalties beyond those recommended by the Committee should be assessed by the instructor.

Suspension by the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee.

  1. Should the Committee decide to suspend the student from the Institute, it will notify the Dean of Students, the Registrar, and the Chairperson of the Admissions and Standing Committee of the suspension. A student choosing to appeal the decision to the Faculty, may remain enrolled and in attendance at the Institute until the appeal has been heard, unless the Committee shall decide on immediate dismissal for reasons relating to the well-being of the student, of other persons, or of the Institute.
  2. The Committee may stipulate suspension for one, two, or three terms. After the suspension period the student will normally be permitted to submit a written petition to the Dean of Students who will review it. After the review, the Dean of Students will submit a recommendation to the Admissions and Standing Committee for final action. See PROBATION AND DISMISSAL and RE-ADMISSION. In unusual cases, such as repeated misconduct, personal injury, or serious violations of law, the Committee may impose permanent suspension, thus ruling out readmission.
  3. A suspension ruling will be recorded on the student's academic record, unless the case is successfully appealed. In the case of temporary suspension, this record will be removed at the end of the suspension period. In the case of permanent suspension it will remain permanently.
  4. A student who is suspended forfeits all rights to a refund of any portion of fees paid and will remain liable for all monies owed.See TUITION AND FEES.
  5. The Committee may stipulate that the Institute will not accept TRANSFER CREDIT earned at another school by a student during the period of suspension from the Institute.
  6. The Chairperson shall report all instances in which the Committee has suspended a student at the next regular Institute Meeting.

V: APPEALING A SUSPENSION TO THE FACULTY

Overview.

  1. The grounds for appeal will generally be (but are not limited to):
  2. That the hearing was not fair (because of biases of members of the Rules and Discipline Committee, etc.)
  3. That the findings of the hearing were not accurate (because evidence was overlooked or improper evidence taken into account.)
  4. That the findings were accurate but the penalty too severe (because mitigating circumstances were not taken into account.)
  5. That the student accepts the findings and the penalty as just but wishes to plead for special consideration.

General Procedures.

  1. A student who is suspended and wishes to appeal this ruling to the Faculty must submit a written appeal to the Chairperson of the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee within five business days of the Committee's ruling.
  2. The Chairperson will provide the student with a copy of the minutes or a recording of the hearing.
  3. Within five business days of receiving the minutes or recording, the student must make a written appeal to the President of the Institute, who will distribute copies to the Dean of Students, the Chairperson of the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee and other persons involved.
  4. The case will be heard at either a regular or special Institute Meeting at the discretion of the President, who will preside at the appeal.
  5. All parties in the case will be permitted to appear at the hearing to make statements and answer questions. The student may be accompanied by a faculty member or other person affiliated with the Institute whom the student selects to serve as counsel.
  6. The proceedings will begin with a report by the Chairperson of the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee, summarizing the previous hearing(s). Then the parties involved shall make their statements of appeal and answer questions from the Faculty. Since this is an appeal and not a re-hearing, witnesses will not be re-heard nor evidence reviewed. The focus will be on errors in the previous hearing, unfairness, or mitigating circumstances.
  7. With all parties dismissed, the Faculty shall discuss its decision. Any faculty member directly involved in the case will be excused from this final deliberation. The decision shall be arrived at by simple majority vote. At the request of any faculty member, the vote will be by secret ballot.
  8. The decision will be announced to all parties and a written report will be prepared by the Institute Secretary, with copies to all parties and a copy to the student's personal record in the Office of the Dean of Students.
  9. The Chairperson will provide the student with a copy of the minutes or a recording of the hearing.
  10. Since the Board of Trustees has granted authority to the Faculty to dismiss students, the Faculty's decision shall be final.

Faculty Action Options.

  1. The Faculty may affirm the action to suspend.
  2. The Faculty may mitigate the penalty, changing permanent suspension to temporary suspension or reducing the terms of suspension.
  3. The Faculty may substitute another penalty for suspension.
  4. The Faculty may remand the case to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee for re-sentencing (i.e., specifying that a penalty other than suspension be assigned).
  5. The Faculty may remand the case to the Institute Rules and Discipline Committee for re-hearing (in cases where there seem to have been serious improprieties in the hearing).
  6. The Faculty may remove all penalties.
  7. The Faculty may not levy penalties in addition to those already imposed.

Committee in Charge: Rules and Discipline Committee.

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act

The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the Institute receives a request for access. Students should submit to the Registrar, Dean, Head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Institute official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the Institute official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the Institute to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the Institute official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.  If the Institute decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the Institute will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is the disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the Institute in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the Institute has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the Institute discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. Unless you request in writing to withhold disclosure of some or all information known as "Directory Information" such "Directory Information" may be disclosed without consent. "Directory Information" includes: name of student, year at Rose-Hulman, local telephone number, local e-mail address, local address, home address, date and place of birth, photograph, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, anticipated graduation date, class schedule, class roster, declared major, degrees and awards received and the most recent previous educational institution attended. If you do not want some or all of the "Directory Information" disclosed, you must inform the Institute in writing on a Request Form to prohibit the release of the information.  Forms are available at the Office of the Registrar and must be filed with the Registrar on or before seven days after the first day when classes begin in the fall. Please consider very carefully the consequences of any decision by you to prohibit the disclosure of any category of "Directory Information". Should you decide to file a request form to prohibit release of information, any future requests for such information from non-institutional persons or organizations will be refused and, for example, this information about you would be omitted from listing to recruiters and commencement announcements, etc.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Rose-Hulman to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605.

Involuntary medical withdrawal guidelines

Subject to Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology's duties under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, a student may be administratively withdrawn involuntarily from the Institute.

Purpose

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology seeks to establish and maintain a community environment that promotes education, research, and service.

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology is particularly concerned with the health and safety of its students, faculty, and staff in an environment that is conducive to personal and intellectual growth.

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology desires to create a procedure separate from the student Discipline and Suspension policy for those students engaged in certain inappropriate behaviors (as described below) resulting from medical reasons.

Process

The Involuntary Medical Withdrawal process will be initiated and a student may be administratively withdrawn from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology when, in the judgment of the Vice-President for Student Affairs, the student's medical condition involves one or more of the following:

  1. A significant danger or imminent threat of harm to self, others, or property.
  2. Behavior that signifies a chronic or repeated threat of harm to others or property.
  3. Behavior that is disruptive to the Rose-Hulman community in that the behavior disturbs the academic pursuits or infringes upon the rights, privileges, health, or safety of others.
  4. The student cannot be effectively treated medically while a member of the academic community.

Any member of the Rose-Hulman community who has reason to believe that a student may meet one or more of the above circumstances may contact the Office of Student Affairs.  The Vice-President for Student Affairs will review any information provided and consult with the counseling staff and/or the attending physician or psychiatrist regarding the health of the student (as permitted by FERPA guidelines). The student may be directed in writing and/or orally (depending upon the urgency of the situation) to attend a meeting with the Vice-President for Student Affairs.  The Vice-President for Student Affairs will meet with the student at the earliest possible time to discuss the student's condition.

Potential Outcomes of Such a Meeting

  1. No action taken.  The student is permitted to remain at Rose-Hulman subject to no special conditions.
  2. Conditional enrollment letter outlining specific actions required by the student to continue at Rose-Hulman.
  3. Withdrawal from Rose-Hulman.  Withdrawal can be immediate.
  4. The Vice-President for Student Affairs may invoke a summary suspension that will result in the student's immediate withdrawal from the Institute. (This may be necessary for the well-being of the student, other persons, or of the Institute.)  The student must comply with this decision, but may proceed with the appeal process within the 48-hour appeal period.

Appeal Process

The student may appeal the Vice President of Student Affairs' decision to the committee consisting of the Rules and Discipline Committee and the Director of International Student Services and Special Programs. Any appeal must be submitted to the chair of the Rules and Discipline Committee in writing within 48 hours of the Vice-President's determination.

An appeal meeting will be scheduled to allow the student to present relevant information concerning the matter.  A representative (a student, faculty, or staff member from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology) may be present to assist the student throughout the formal process.

At the conclusion of the meeting with the Committee, all information will be considered and a letter will be furnished to the student and the Vice-President for Student Affairs containing the committee's conclusions regarding the appeal.

Re-Admittance

If an involuntary medical withdrawal occurs, conditions for re-admittance may be imposed by the Vice President of Student Affairs at the time of the withdrawal. As the result of an involuntary medical withdrawal under this policy, a student may be asked to submit, prior to resuming classes or on-campus residence, a letter to the Vice-President for Student Affairs from a licensed health care professional stating that the student is capable of resuming academic course work and adhering to the responsibilities of living in a residence hall community.  In addition, the student will schedule and attend a meeting with the Admissions and Standing Committee as a condition of readmission.  This meeting can be arranged through the assistance of the Vice-President for Student Affairs or the Registrar's Office.  The Admissions and Standing Committee will determine whether the student shall be readmitted.

Refunds

A student withdrawn from classes under this policy is eligible for tuition and fee refunds and residence hall refunds according to the Rose-Hulman Student Handbook.

Anti-hazing policy

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology strictly prohibits campus student organizations from hazing or participating in activities which recklessly or intentionally endanger the mental or physical health of students including the forced consumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation into or association with these organizations.

In short, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology is strictly anti-hazing!

Any person violating this policy is subject to suspension, expulsion, or other firm Institute disciplinary action. An organization which authorizes hazing activities will forfeit all campus privileges, including the right to license or exist on the campus.

All organizations should understand that offenders are also subject to prosecution through applicable criminal statutes on manslaughter, reckless endangerment, or assault.

 

Policy on drugs and alcoholic beverages

The Institute believes that the development of self-discipline, individual responsibility and respect for law will be enhanced by entrusting to students a greater responsibility for compliance with State law and by the removal of complete prohibitions which are not enforceable in practice.

Therefore, the Institute draws to the attention of all its members that it is unlawful for any person to sell, furnish, give or cause to be sold, furnished or given away any alcoholic beverages to any person under the age of 21 years. The Institute expects each individual student and each student living unit to assume responsibility for compliance with this provision of the Indiana Alcoholic Beverage Control Act on the Rose-Hulman campus. The Institute has particular concern for the assumption of this responsibility by students who are not yet 21 years of age and are, therefore, more exposed to violations of the law; this concern applies especially to freshman students, not merely because they are exposed to violations of the law but also and importantly because they are new to college life with its attendant problems of adjustment and achievement. These regulations rest on the assumption that Rose-Hulman students, relying on residence regulations and their own judicial procedures, are capable of individual and group self-discipline.

  • Each Rose student is individually and personally responsible for compliance with the applicable provisions of the law of the state of Indiana.
  • Alcoholic beverages may not be used by students on the campus except within the privacy of their own living quarters.
  • Alcoholic beverages shall not be possessed, nor consumed by students in the "public" areas (i.e., lobby areas, corridors, or reception areas) of residence halls nor can they be made generally available through bar setups, at "rush" functions in fraternity houses, etc.
  • Alcoholic beverages may not be dispensed on the campus or at fraternity houses at any time through the use of beer trucks, kegs, etc., which are clearly for the purpose of mass consumption by students.
  • Alcoholic beverages are not permitted at varsity or intramural athletic events.
  • Alcoholic beverages shall not be sold on the Rose campus without the approval of the President of the Institute.
  • Violations of these alcoholic beverage regulations, as of other Institute regulations, shall be subject to discipline through regular procedures.
  • Consumption of alcohol is prohibited at all athletic events.

It is emphasized that when alcoholic beverages are used at all, they should be used in moderation and that the conduct of students on the Rose-Hulman campus shall at no time be disorderly or otherwise offensive due to immoderate use of alcohol or for any other reason. The Institute does not condone violation of the State law concerning the use of alcoholic beverages under any circumstances when such use impairs personal health, academic achievement, or the best interest of the Rose-Hulman community.

DRUG ABUSE AND THE COLLEGE ENVIRONMENT

Rose-Hulman is a microcosm of American mainstream society. As such, its citizens reflect all of the general characteristics of such a richly diversified nation.

The news media throughout the country report daily on the alarming incidence of various forms of "drug abuse" among our citizens. Some have even stated that drugs may be the single most dangerous domestic threat facing this country.

Clearly, drug abuse is a problem which we need to address in all segments of society. The Rose-Hulman community is no exception. It's simply naive to believe that drugs and the potential for drug abuse do not exist here. They do exist here, and there is abuse.

At their worst, drugs kill. At their very least, they disrupt lives, cut short promising careers, and cause a wide variety of physiological and psychological problems. Moreover, distribution and/or use of illegal drugs can lead to serious legal problems.

We have prepared this brochure as a quick reference for all citizens of the campus. Its overriding goal is to prevent drug abuse by providing facts that refute any alleged benefits. However, we also realize that some may be currently abusing drugs, and specific steps are offered for getting professional help.

This brochure is both an educational piece and a statement of policy for students and employees of Rose-Hulman. If you have never abused drugs, it's our hope that this information will be reinforcing. If you are currently abusing drugs, hopefully this piece will help you recognize the problem for what it is, admit it to yourself, and seek help. Together, we can strive to make the Rose-Hulman environment drug-free.

DRUGS: Their Impact on Daily Life

Why do people abuse drugs? There are almost as many "reasons" as there are people who abuse drugs. At first, many young people experiment with drugs because of "peer pressure", "adult examples", "to feel grown up", 'to rebel" against parental values and authority, "curiosity", "for kicks", "to escape" problems, or because of their wide availability. Later, some may decide to continue using drugs 'to relieve boredom", "to get more energy, to obtain a "high", 'to feel more creative", 'to improve performance", 'to reduce anxiety and tension", 'to solve problems", 'to escape reality, or 'to help relate to other people". Whatever the reason, the fact is that drugs can become a daily habit and can actually create a physical or psychological NEED within the user. In this sense, they can have a devastating effect on the daily life of the user and those closest to that individual.

The stereotype of the drug abuser (i.e., the dead beat, skid row bum, etc.) can blind us to the existence of a student's or co-worker's drug or alcohol problem. Most abusers do not "fit" this stereotype. For example, a serious cocaine user is typically:

  • well educated (14 years of schooling)
  • employed (77 percent)
  • well paid (37 percent earn over $25,000 annually)
  • engaged in illegal activities to support the drug habit (56 percent)
STATE AND FEDERAL STATUTES
Both the State of Indiana and the Federal Government have statutes which expressly prohibit the possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs. In addition, Indiana statute prohibits the possession, use or distribution of alcohol by persons under the age of 21. Federal penalties for illegal possession of a controlled substance are:
  • 1st conviction: Up to 1 year imprisonment and fined at least $1000 but not more than $100,000, or both.
  • After 1 prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed 2 years and fined at least $2500 but not more than $250,000, or both.
  • Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine: Mandatory at least 5 years in prison, not to exceed 20 years and fined up to $250,000 or both, if:
    1. 1st conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds
      5 grams.
    2. 2nd crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams.
    3. 3rd or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 1 gram.
ROSE-HULMAN DRUGS AND NARCOTICS POLICY

The following is a listing of some of the commonly abused drugs with related physical and psychological side affects. It is because of the severity of these harmful effects, both for the individual and in some cases, for those around him, that the Institute has adopted strict policies regarding illegal drugs and narcotics on the campus. In short, Rose-Hulman will not tolerate the possession, use or distribution of illegal drugs on the campus by anyone associated with the Institute. Anyone found violating this policy will be subject to disciplinary action, including possible dismissal and criminal prosecution. (Employees- See additional Policy statement in Appendix A.)

Here, then, is an analysis of the impact of some of the commonly abused drugs:

Type of Drug

Name (and "slang")

Possible Effects

STIMULANTS

Speed up the action of central nervous system.

Amphetamines ("speed, "uppers", "bennies", "pep pills") Tolerance, psychological and possible physical dependence can develop. Hallucinations may occur. High doses can cause heart problems, malnutrition, death.
  Cocaine ("coke", "snow", "crack", "base", "rock") - a narcotic Confusion, depression, hallucinations may occur.

Tolerance and physical dependence.

Physical effects unpredictable-convulsions, coma, and death are possible.

Nasal membrane damage.

DEPRESSANTS

Relax the central nervous system

Barbiturates

("barbs", "goofballs", "downers", "blues")

Tranquilizers ("valium", "librium")

Methaqualone ("soapers", "quads", "ludes")

Confusion, loss of control, etc., may occur.

Tolerance, physical and psychological dependence can develop.

Overdose can cause coma, death.

In combination with alcohol, can be fatal.

CANNABIS

Alters mood and perception.

Marijuana
("grass", "pot", "weed")

Hashish ("hash", "oil")

Confusion, loss of control, hallucinations.

Moderate tolerance and long-term psychological dependence.

Damage to lung tissue.

ALCOHOL

Depressed central nervous system

Don't be fooled by the fact that alcohol is not controlled in the same way that other drugs are - it's a powerful depressant. Long-term, heavy drinking is linked to cancer, heart disease, liver damage, loss of muscle tone, and other serious illnesses. (For Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology student policy on alcohol please refer to pp. 16-17 of the Student Handbook.)
HALLUCINOGENS

Temporarily distort reality.

Lysergic Acid Diethylamide ("LSD", "acid") Hallucinations, panic. Tolerance develops. Effects can recur ("flashbacks").
  Phencyclidine ("PCP", "angel dust")

Legally classified as a depressant.

Depression, hallucinations, confusion, irrational behavior.

Tolerance develops.

Overdose can cause convulsions, coma, death.

  Mescaline, MDA, DMT, STP, psilocybin ("designer drugs") Effects similar to those of LSD.
NARCOTICS

Lower perception of pain.

Heroin ("H", "scag", "junk", "smack")

Morphine ("M", "dreamer")

Codeine Opium

Lethargy, apathy, loss of judgment and self-control may occur. Tolerance, physical and psychological dependence can develop. Overdose can cause convulsions, coma, and death.

Risks include malnutrition, infection, and hepatitis.


Clearly, abusing drugs can be extremely DANGEROUS, especially when taken in excess, for a long time, or in the wrong combinations. If you take drugs, you risk - OVERDOSE. DEPENDENCE. ILL HEALTH. ACCIDENTS, and it can lead to LEGAL PROBLEMS. ECONOMIC PROBLEMS. and PERSONAL PROBLEMS.

The Signs of Drug Abuse

Obviously, the best time to prevent drug abuse is before it starts. Unfortunately, that is not possible in all cases. The next best alternative is to recognize the symptoms and attempt to get professional help for the individual.

Though each drug has its own set of symptoms, there are many characteristics that are common to the abuse of virtually all drugs. They include:

  • Abrupt changes in attendance, a decline in grades or performance.
  • Deterioration of physical condition - less stamina, poor appearance, etc.
  • Out-of-character mood swings. Over-protection of "personal" belongings.
  • Wearing sunglasses in inappropriate weather.
  • Unusual borrowing of money.
  • Social withdrawal from usual group of friends.
  • Stealing of items that can be pawned or sold. Changed frequency in trips to bathroom, basement, etc.
  • More specific symptoms for individual drug types include:

COCAINE (and other stimulants)

  1. Dilated pupils.
  2. Excessive activity, irritability, nervousness, and aggression.
  3. Dry mouth and nose (user licks lips frequently), bad breath.
  4. Weight loss (abuser will go long periods without food or sleep).
  5. May have needle marks if injecting the drug.

DEPRESSANTS

  1. Appears intoxicated, but with no alcohol odor on breath.
  2. Tends to fall asleep in class or in meetings.
  3. Loss of interest in previously important activities.

HALLUCINOGENS

  1. Often seems to be in dreamlike or trancelike state.
  2. May examine everyday common objects for long periods of time.
  3. Body image and shapes may be distorted; panic may result.
  4. Sweating, flushed skin, and excessive salivation (for PCP users).

MARIJUANA

  1. Odor of marijuana present.
  2. Whites of eyes irritated.
  3. Less active, quieter than normal
  4. Episodes of acute anxiety, panic attacks.

OPIATES

  1. Raw, red nostrils if sniffing, needle marks if injecting.
  2. Lethargy, drowsy behavior when high.
  3. Intensely purposeful when trying to obtain money or locate drug.
  4. Excessive need for money.

Getting Help:  Decision Time

Do people who abuse drugs need help? Do people who abuse drugs want help?

While help for the individual abuser is available in the community on a highly confidential basis, it is extremely difficult to break through the abuser's denial - denial of being an abuser, denial that there is a problem. In fact, denial is one of the most prevalent traits exhibited by the drug abuser. In many cases, they have even deluded themselves for long periods into believing, 'there is no problem."

Therefore, confrontations, even by a close friend, are likely to have little impact on the suspected abuser. If you should opt for that course of action, be prepared. That means having documentation that supports your suspicions. Have a list ready of symptoms of behavioral changes which you have noticed that may indicate the possibility of drug use. Be prepared, too, for the immediate denial by the individual and the potential for a "loss of friendship". But, if your "hunches" are correct and you feel strongly about the "evidence", persistence can help break through the barriers.

If you do not wish to confront the individual even if your suspicions are very strong, it is best to involve professional counselors on the campus. In any event, don't simply 'throw up your hands" and give up! Your action, even indirectly, could help to save a life!

About Confidentiality

Whether you are a fellow instructor, a fellow staff member, or a fellow student, if you suspect that someone you know is abusing drugs, it is important that you keep those suspicions confidential until you've decided to act. That means sharing your thoughts only with the suspected abuser, with those who are qualified, and those who are in positions of responsibility. Rule of thumb: The fewer people you tell the better for everyone concerned.

The Abuser is Me!

If reading through this information has maybe helped you to focus on your own problem or potential problem with drug abuse, then let us help you further by suggesting specific sources of help in our community. Keep in mind that confidentiality is a central feature of all such agency services. Also keep in mind that breaking a drug habit without outside help can be dangerous (because of withdrawal symptoms) and difficult (because of psychological need).

Community Substance Abuse Services

AA Treatment Center, 24 Hour Helpline

800-711 -6375

AA Intergroup

 234-0827

Clay County Addiction Program 

448-8801

Discover Recovery

234-9911

Hamilton Center Addiction Services

231 -8171

Lifeline  

235-8333

Prenatal Substance Abuse Program

231 -8323

Regional Hospital Behavioral Health Service

234-1475

Sullivan County Addiction Program

268-6376

Union Hospital Behavioral Health Service

238-7384

Vermillion County Addiction Service

765-832-2436


Other sources of help include the family physician, clergy, and psychologists and psychiatrists in private practice.

If you would like help in making contact with any community agency, please visit the Student Affairs Office in the Student Union Building, or dial Health Services at ext. 8367 or Student Health Counseling at ext. 8537. No names have to be given to get help with a referral.

REMEMBER: DRUG ABUSE IS A SERIOUS MATTER!

THE RISKS ARE GREAT AND THE RESULTS CAN BE DEADLY!

Some of the information in this section was taken from About Drug Abuse, a Channing L. Bete Co., Inc. publication.

Sexual harassment policy

It is the goal of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology to provide the optimal educational and professional environment for all students, faculty, and staff. Rose-Hulman is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination, equal employment, and equal educational opportunity with respect to recruitment, hiring, training, promotion, and treatment of persons in all organizations, services, and programs. Discrimination based on race, religion, color, national origin, sex, age, citizenship status, disability, veteran status or sexual orientation is prohibited.

It is a violation of Institute policy for any employee or student to sexually harass any other employee or student. Prohibited conduct includes making requests for sexual favors, unwelcome sexual advances or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature a condition of an employee's continued employment or a student's continued education, as well as both the taking or failure to take any personnel or academic action as a reprisal against any person for rejecting such prohibited conduct. No employee or student shall threaten or insinuate, either explicitly or implicitly, that an individual's submission to or refusal to submit to sexual advances will affect the person's employment, academic progress, evaluation, wages, advancement, assigned duties, shifts, or any other condition of employment or academic development. All persons are prohibited from conduct of a sexual nature that creates an intimidating, humiliating or offensive working or educational environment.

Examples of sexual harassment may include, but are not limited to, such conduct as the following:

  • Unwelcome sexual advances, flirtations, requests for sexual activity, verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.
  • Sexual jokes, slurs, speculations about sexual orientation or experience, or sexually explicit statements.
  • The display of sexually suggestive objects or pictures.

Any student who believes that he or she has been subject to sexual harassment, whether on the premises of the Rose-Hulman campus or elsewhere,  should promptly report the incident in writing* by completing a Sexual Harassment Resolution Form ( http://www.rose-hulman.edu/HR/Policies/Harassment%20and%20Sexual%20Misconduct%20Policy_2011.pdf) and submitting it to one of the following persons:

  • Dean of Students
  • Title IX Coordinator (Associate Dean of Student Affairs or designee)
  • Assistant Title IX Coordinator (Director of Human Resources or designee)
  • Academic Advisor
  • Residence Hall Staff
  • Student Affairs Staff

*While it is preferable to have the complaint in writing, a verbal complaint will also be acted upon in the same manner.

It is the Institute's policy to investigate promptly all complaints of sexual harassment and, where appropriate, to take prompt remedial action.  Additionally, if the Institute knows about student-on-student  harassment that creates a hostile environment, it will take immediate action to eliminate the harassment, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects.  Reports of alleged sexual harassment or sexual misconduct will be investigated as discreetly as the circumstances permit and without recrimination, regardless of where the harassment or misconduct occurred.  If the complainant requests confidentiality or asks that the complaint not be pursued, the Institute will take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the complaint consistent with the request for confidentiality or request not to pursue an investigation. 

After appropriate investigation, any individual who is found to have engaged in sexual harassment or sexual misconduct will be subject to appropriate sanctions up to and including suspension/expulsion from school for a student or termination for an employee.  Additionally, any person who discriminates or takes adverse action against another person because that person complains of harassment or assists in an investigation of a harassment complaint will also be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion from school or the termination of employment. 

While the investigation's duration will depend on the nature of the alleged act, generally, a standard investigation, without an appeal process, will take approximately 60 calendar days.  All parties involved will be promptly notified of the outcome of the investigation, provided with a copy of the written report, and informed of the actions, if any, taken in connection with the complaint.

Any person who engages in sexual harassment is subject to disciplinary action, including termination of employment or expulsion. Any person who discriminates or takes adverse action against another person because that person complains of sexual harassment or assists an investigation of a sexual harassment complaint will also be subject to disciplinary action, including termination of employment or expulsion.

Policy on sexual assault

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology has a clear institutional policy against rape and other forms of sexual assault. It is important for all campus citizens to understand that these crimes will not be tolerated under any circumstances. Sexual violence on campus is repugnant. It's an extreme violation of individual rights, and it is contrary to the mission of this college.

Therefore, it is extremely important that all students, faculty, and staff understand the policy in detail. Compliance with this policy is a condition of enrollment or employment at Rose-Hulman.

Definition of Rape

While there are many forms of sexual assault, rape is by far the most prevalent. Rape is generally defined as forced sexual intercourse that is perpetrated against the will of the victim. The type of force may involve physical violence, coercion, or threat of harm to the victim. It is an extremely violent crime.

Acquaintance Rape

On college campuses the most prevalent form of rape is acquaintance rape. The acquaintance may be a date or a friend of the victim, or someone the victim knows casually, from a residence hall, from a class, or through mutual friends.

Regardless of the relationship between parties, if one person uses force to coerce another to submit to sexual intercourse, the act is defined as rape. The same criminal laws and penalties apply in cases of acquaintance rape as in cases of stranger rape.

Other Criminal Sexual Assaults

Besides rape, there are other types of felonious sexual crimes that involve forced penetration of the victim including sodomy, oral copulation, and rape by a foreign object.

"Sexual battery," as defined in courts of law, is generally the unwanted touching of an intimate part of the victim's body, such as sexual organ, buttocks, or breast, for the purpose of sexual arousal.

While sexual harassment is yet another form of sexual assault, the sexual harassment policy of the college is detailed in a separate policy statement (above).

Disciplinary Hearings, Criminal Process, and Disciplinary Actions

Where there is probable cause to believe that policies prohibiting sexual assault have been violated, Rose-Hulman will pursue strong disciplinary action through its own channels. This discipline includes the possibility of suspension.

It is important for all constituents to understand that they can be both prosecuted under the State of Indiana criminal statues and disciplined by Rose-Hulman. It should also be understood that Rose-Hulman can pursue disciplinary action even if the criminal justice authorities do not prosecute.

The procedures for disciplinary hearing in student sexual assault cases will be as described under "Institute Policies, Rules, and Regulations", Section II-Non-Academic Misconduct in the Student Handbook ( http://www.rose-hulman.edu/offices-services/student-affairs/student-handbook-2012-2013/institute-policies,-rules-regulations.aspx).

If found guilty by the hearing body, other possible penalties include suspension for a specified time, exclusion from certain areas of the campus, and/or mandatory counseling. Various sanctions can also be invoked against entire organizations whose members may be found guilty of sexual assault, including disbanding the organization, restricting female guests, or requesting action by the national office if it is an affiliated organization.

The Trauma of Sexual Assault

Those victimized by sexual assault generally experience profound emotional trauma which severely impacts their daily functioning. Some common responses include feelings of shock and disbelief, intense fears about personal safety, preoccupation with recurrent and intensive thought about the assault, sleep disturbances, anxiety, impaired concentration, mood swings, depression, feelings of anger, shame, and self-blame. These reactions are called "post-traumatic stress disorder" or "rape trauma syndrome".

Rights of Victims

Rose-Hulman will do everything it can to assist the victim with appropriate counseling and support. Victims of sexual assault shall be afforded the opportunity to be present at hearings and to have counsel present. That person can be a member of the faculty or counseling staff of Rose-Hulman, a friend, or anyone else at the college that the victim feels can provide either valuable insight or reassurance throughout the hearing process. The willingness of the victim to "confront" the assailant(s) is important to the community as well as the victim's psychological well-being.

Unfortunately, many sexual assault victims never report their assault, for a variety of reasons. Many experience such intense feelings of shame and self-blame that they are reluctant to report the assault or to seek assistance. Some are afraid that their assailant may retaliate against them if they report the crime. Others may believe that family and friends will criticize or perhaps even blame them. Some may feel that the "system" will, in effect, put them on trial. Whatever the reason, not reporting may encourage assailants to attack others.

Victims of sexual assault are strongly urged to report the assault immediately to residence hall staff, to professional staff in Student Affairs, to Public Safety, to the Title IX Coordinator or Assistant Title IX Coordinator, or to any faculty or administrative staff member in whom they have confidence, via reporting procedures described above ( http://www.rose-hulman.edu/HR/Policies/Harassment%20and%20Sexual%20Misconduct%20Policy_2011.pdf).  Reports will be given the highest degree of confidentiality until such that a hearing should take place or that criminal action is sought through the Prosecutors Office.