The mechanical engineering curriculum is designed to prepare students for productive careers in industry, government, education and private consulting as well as for graduate study. Thus, it is based on the fundamental principles of science and engineering. These provide a strong foundation that enables students to apply what they have learned to the complex technological problems of today and to teach themselves the new technologies of tomorrow. Since mechanical engineering is a broad field of endeavor, the curriculum offers a strong technical elective program to allow each student to craft a broad educational experience and to develop the flexibility to pursue diverse career goals.

No less than any professional, the mechanical engineering graduate must work within the social and environmental context of our world. To be effective and successful, he or she must be aware of the roles of engineering and science in solving complex technological and social problems as well as of the impacts of social and environmental factors on engineering activities such as design. To foster this awareness, the curriculum allows the student an unusually wide choice of social science and humanities electives and emphasizes the links between society and engineering through courses such as Engineering Design Processes and Methodology.

The strength of any department is its faculty. The mechanical engineering faculty is committed to providing a dynamic and innovative learning environment and to maintaining and increasing their technical competence in a rapidly changing world. Stereotypes notwithstanding, they understand that people are more important than things. Thus, they encourage each student to seek them out when he or she has academic problems or needs guidance in career planning.

The freshman year of the mechanical engineering program includes courses in mathematics, physics, humanities and social science as well as introductory courses in engineering and design. The sophomore year features courses in mathematics, chemistry and the engineering sciences. The final two years of the program stress the design and analysis of systems, machines and their components, and the transfer and transformation of energy. The required courses provide the basic mathematical and scientific fundamentals underlying the practice of mechanical engineering, while 20 cr. hrs. of technical elective courses and 8 cr. hrs. of free elective courses allow flexibility in adapting the program to the interests and abilities of the individual student. The student is not encouraged to specialize in a particular area but rather to seek a broad background in basic engineering principles. For the student who wishes to pursue a career in the field of aerospace engineering, however, extensive sequences of courses are available as elective offerings.

The mechanical engineering program is designed to encourage the best students to continue their education at the graduate level. For those who choose to study at Rose-Hulman, graduate work leading to a Master of Science degree is offered by the Mechanical Engineering Department. Options in the general areas of Thermal/Fluids Systems and Solid Systems Design are available. These options are devoted to developing a deeper understanding of engineering and are not intended to constrain the student to a high degree of specialization.

Mission: To provide the curriculum, the educational environment, and the individual support necessary to graduate mechanical engineers who are technically competent, effective in practice, creative, ethical and mindful of their responsibility to society.

Vision: To graduate the best baccalaureate mechanical engineers.

Mechanical Engineering Program Educational Objectives and Student Outcomes

Program Educational Objectives

The mechanical engineering curriculum is designed to prepare students for productive careers in industry, government, education, and private consulting as well as for graduate study. Thus, it is based on the fundamental principles of science and engineering. These provide a strong foundation that enables students to apply what they have learned to the complex technological problems of today and to teach themselves the new technologies of tomorrow. Thus, we expect our graduates to attain the educational objectives listed below within a few years of graduation. Our educational objectives are based on the needs of our constituencies.

  1. Our graduates will be successful in their careers.
  2. Our graduates set and meet their own goals for career fulfillment.
  3. Our graduates will continue professional development.
  4. Our graduates will engage the international dimensions of their profession.

Student Outcomes

Student outcomes describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. These relate to the skills, knowledge, and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program.

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  4. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  7. an ability to communicate effectively
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

 

Area Minor*** in Thermal-Fluids

To complete the requirements of the thermal-fluids area minor, a student must fulfill the following three expectations:

(1) Completion of a set of 2 courses covering basic fluid mechanics and basic thermodynamics. These are commonly required for most engineering majors. Acceptable sets include:

  • ES 201 Conservation & Accounting Principles
    ES 202 Fluid & Thermal Systems
    or
  • ME 201 Thermodynamics
    EM 301 Fluid Mechanics
    or
  • CHE 201 Conservation Principles & Balances
    CHE 301 Fluid Mechanics

(2) One of the following foundational prerequisites.
ME 301 Thermodynamics II
CHE 303 Chem. Engineering Thermodynamics
ME 302 Heat Transfer
CHE 320 Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer

(3) Three of the thermal-fluids electives listed below.
Thermal Fluid Systems
ME 407 Power Plants**
ME 408 Renewable Energy
ME 409 Air Conditioning*
ME 410 Internal Combustion Engines
ME 411 Propulsion Systems**
ME 426 Turbomachinery

Thermal Fluid Sciences
ME 401 Foundation of Fluid Mechanics
ME 402 Advanced Heat Transfer*
ME 405 Theoretical Aerodynamics
ME 427 Computational Fluid Dynamics
ME 450 Combustion
ME 501 Advanced Thermodynamics**
ME 502 Topics in Heat Transfer*
ME 503 Viscous Fluid Flow
ME 510 Gas Dynamics
EM 501 Topics in Fluid Mechanics

Successful completion of an area minor is indicated on the student's transcript. A student interested in pursuing an area minor in mechanical engineering should consult with the chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.
____________________________
**Requires one of the thermodynamics prerequisites from section 2 above.
* Requires one of the heat transfer prerequisites from section 2 above.
*** ME Majors do not qualify for ME Area Minors, but may pursue ME Concentrations.

Areas of Concentration

Students who complete recommended courses in an area of concentration may receive, upon request, a letter from the Department Head attesting to the fact that the student has completed the requirements in the selected area of concentration in the Mechanical Engineering Department. With proper planning, students should be able to take these course offerings without overload. Students may include special topics courses or new courses not yet listed in the catalog to the list of acceptable courses for a concentration with written permission from the mechanical engineering department head

Advanced Transportation Concentration
To better prepare our students for the interdisciplinary field of Advanced Transportation, an area of concentration is offered to expose students to modern automotive, aviation, and off-highway design methodologies and technologies. Two courses in Model-Based System Design, the modern design practice in the aviation and automotive industry, is required of all participants. Three additional elective courses are required which permit students to provide either depth or breadth according to their interests.

Required Courses
ECE/ME 497 Introduction to Model-Based System Design
ECE/ME 497 Advanced Model Based-System Design

Elective Courses
CHEM 470 Combustion Chemistry

ECE 320 Linear Control Systems
or
ME 406 Control Systems

ECE 420 Nonlinear Control Systems
or
ME 506 Advanced Control Systems

ECE 370 Machines & Power
ECE 410 Communication Networks
ECE 452 Power Electronics

ME 408 Renewable Energy
ME 410 Internal Combustion Engines
ME 411 Propulsion Systems
ME 422 Finite Elements for Engineering Applications
ME 427 Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 
ME 450 Combustion

Aerospace Engineering Area of Concentration
The aerospace industry provides job opportunities each year for many mechanical engineering graduates. The aerospace engineering area of concentration is intended to provide specialty courses which focus the application of basic mechanical engineering skills on aerospace systems.

The courses required to complete the concentration are as follows:

ME 305 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering

Plus any 4 of the following

MA 336 Boundary Value Problems
ME 405 Theoretical Aerodynamics
ME 401 Foundation of Fluid Mechanics
ME 411 Propulsion Systems
ME 422 Intro to Finite Element Fundamentals
ME 426 Turbomachinery
ME 427 Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
ME 461 Aerospace Design
ME 503 Viscous Flow
ME 510 Gas Dynamics
ME 512 Light Weight Structures
ME 522 Advanced Finite Element Analysis
PH 322 Celestial Mechanics

Any student who completes these requirements may receive, on request, a letter from the Department Head attesting to the fact that the student has completed the requirements in the aerospace engineering area of concentration in the Mechanical Engineering Department. With proper planning, students should be able to complete the concentration without overload. Additional courses may satisfy the concentration with Department Head approval.

Energy Production, Utilization, and Forecasting
Rising energy costs, air pollution, climate change, petrochemical production, environmental friendly and green processes and machines, alternative power sources and renewable energy are some of the topics topping local, national and international news. Rose-Hulman offers a series of courses, across several disciplines that broadens, educates and addresses solutions to these relevant contemporary issues.

Students who complete any five of the recommended courses in Energy Production, Utilization, and Forecasting area of concentration may receive, upon request, a letter from their Department Head, a certificate and transcript annotation attesting to the fact that the student has completed the requirements in this area of concentration in the Energy Production, Utilization, and Forecasting. With proper planning, students should be able to take these course offerings without overload.

Recommended Energy Production, Utilization, and Forecasting Concentration Courses.

CE 561 or CHE 450 Air Pollution (cross-listed class)
CE 590 Climate Change Assessment
CHE 490 Energy and Environment
CHE 512 Petrochemical Processes
ECE 370 Power and Energy Systems
ECE 371 Industrial Power Systems
ME 407 Power Plants
ME 408 Renewable Energy
ME 450 Combustion
ME 501 Advanced Thermodynamics

Industrial Leadership
Many mechanical engineering students are attracted to industry for both technical and leadership opportunities. Graduates often are responsible for project management and may develop over time into more significant leadership roles. This area of concentration is intended to take advantage of Rose-Hulman offerings in Mathematics, Engineering Management, and Humanities and Social Sciences to provide skills and knowledge that would be useful for graduates with increasing managerial responsibilities. Since part of leadership is also practice, the area of concentration requires one industrial internship and one significant leadership experience.

To complete the requirements of the area of concentration in industrial leadership, each student must take a total of six courses, two from the Math list, two from the Engineering Management list, and two from the Humanities, Social Sciences list

Math List
MA 385 Quality Methods
MA 487 Design of Experiments
MA 387 Statistical Methods in Six Sigma

Engineering Management List
EMGT 330 Introduction to Engineering Management
EMGT 427 Project Management
EMGT 520 Accounting for Technical Managers
EMGT 521 Financial Management in a Technical Environment
EMGT 522 Organizational Management
EMGT 523 Marketing Issues in a Technical Environment 4
EMGT 524 Production/Operations Management
EMGT 526 Technology Management and Forecasting
EMGT 527 Project Management
EMGT 531 Economics for Technical Managers
EMGT 532 Technical Entrepreneurship
EMGT 533 Intercultural Communication
EMGT 534 Management Science
EMGT 535 Strategies for Organizational Change
EMGT 586 Supply Chain Management
EMGT 587 Systems Engineering
EMGT 588 Quality Management l
EMGT 589 Manufacturing Systems

Humanities, Social Sciences List
GS 350 International Trade
GS 351 International Finance
IA 230 Fundamentals of Public Speaking
SV 151 Principles of Economics
SV 350 Managerial Accounting
SV 351 Managerial Economics
IA 352 Game Theory
SV 303 Business and Engineering Ethics
SV 304 Bioethics
SV 352 Money & Banking
SV 353 Industrial Organization
SV 354 Environmental Economics
SV 356 Corporate Finance
EMGT 526 Technology Management and Forecasting

In addition to coursework, students must complete one Industrial Internship (of approximately three month duration) and one significant co-curricular leadership experience. To get credit for the leadership experience, the student must submit an application with reference support which is approved by the department head. Possible examples of qualifying leadership could include leadership experience in design-build competitions or serving as a Resident Assistant in the residence halls.

Manufacturing and Production Engineering Area of Concentration
Many mechanical engineering graduates will work in tasks related to the manufacture of various products. The manufacturing and production engineering area of concentration is intended to bridge the gap between the analytical and design courses which are the heart of the professional program and the practical problems of producing acceptable hardware, on time, at a profit.
The courses that comprise this area of concentration are:

EMGT 330 Introduction to Engineering Management
EMGT 427 Project Management
EMGT 588 Quality Management
EMGT 589 Manufacturing Systems
MA 385 Quality Methods
ME 317 Design for Manufacturing
ME 417 Advanced Materials Engineering
ME 435 Robotics
ME 520 Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing

When choosing humanities and social science electives (HSS), we suggest that the following are most pertinent to the manufacturing/production working environment:

SV 151 Principles of Econmoics
SV 171 Principles of Psychology
SV 350 Managerial Accounting
SV 351 Managerial Economics
SV 353 Industrial Organization
IA 453 The Entrepreneur
SV 356 Corporate Finance

With proper planning, students should be able to take the elective offerings in this area without overload. Any student who completes five courses from List 1 and three of the recommended HSS courses from List 2 may receive, upon request, a letter from the Department Head attesting to the fact that the student has completed the requirements in the manufacturing and production engineering area of concentration in the Mechanical Engineering Department.

Solid Mechanics Area of Concentration
The broad field of solid mechanics prepares the mechanical engineering graduate with many career opportunities in areas such as stress analysis, dynamics, vibrations, materials, and the design of mechanical components and systems.
The courses that comprise this area of concentration are:

ME 417 Advanced Materials Engineering
ME 422 Intro. Finite Element Fund.
ME 512 Light Weight Structures
ME 513 Environmental Noise
ME 518 Advanced Kinematics
ME 522 Advanced Finite Element Analysis
EM 403 Advanced Mechanics of Materials
EM 406 Vibration Analysis
EM 502 Advanced Dynamics
EM 503 Advanced Vibration Analysis
EM 505 Theory of Elasticity

With proper planning, students should be able to take five elective courses in the area without overload. Any student who completes five of these recommended courses may request a letter from the Department Head attesting to the fact that the student has completed the requirements in the solid mechanics area of concentration within the Mechanical Engineering Department.

Thermal Fluid Area of Concentration
Many Mechanical Engineering graduates will work with engineering systems that are based on the principles of thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid mechanics. The Mechanical Engineering curriculum offers an opportunity for the student to concentrate his studies on the analysis and design of these systems. The courses that comprise the thermal fluid area of concentration may be classified according to whether the main emphasis is on the system or on the thermal or fluid concepts which underpin its design and operation.

Thermal Fluid Systems

ME 407 Power Plants
ME 408 Renewable Energy
ME 409 Air Conditioning
ME 410 Internal Combustion Engines
ME 411 Propulsion Systems
ME 426 Turbomachinery

Thermal Fluid Sciences

ME 401 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics
ME 402 Advanced Heat Transfer
ME 405 Theoretical Aerodynamics
ME 427 Computational Fluid Dynamics
ME 450 Combustion
ME 501 Advanced Thermodynamics
ME 502 Topics in Heat Transfer
ME 503 Viscous Fluid Flow
ME 510 Gas Dynamics
EM 501 Topics in Fluid Mechanics

In order to complete the requirements in the thermal fluid area of concentration a student must select five elective from the lists such that at least one course is taken from the **Thermal Fluid Systems**list and at least two courses are taken from the **Thermal Fluid Sciences**list.
With proper planning, students should be able to take five elective courses in the area without overload. Any student who completes five of these recommended courses may request a letter from the Department Head attesting to the fact that the student has completed the requirements in the thermal fluid area of concentration within the Mechanical Engineering Department.

The mechanical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET,www.abet.org

MECHANICAL ENIGNEERING PLAN OF STUDY

Freshman Year  
Fall Term  Credit
MA 111 Calculus I 5
PH 111 Physics I 4
CLSK 100 College & Life Skills 1
EM 104 Graphical Communications 2
RH 131

HSS
Rhetoric and Composition split fall or winter with Elective 4
  Total 16
     
Winter Term  Credit
MA 112 Calculus II 5
PH 112 Physics II 4
EM 121 Statics and Mechanics 
of Materials I
4
RH 131

HSS
Rhetoric and Composition split fall or winter with Elective 4
  Total 17
     
Spring Term  Credit
MA 113 Calculus III 5
PH 113 Physics III 4
EM 103 Introduction to Design 2
ME 123 Computer Applications I 4
  Total 15
Sophomore Year  
Fall Term  Credit
MA 211 Differential Equations 4
ES 201 Conservation & 
Accounting Principles
4
ES 203 Electrical Systems 4
HSS Elective 4
  Total 16
     
Winter Term  Credit
MA 212 Matrix Algebra and Systems 
of Differential Equations
4
ES 202 Fluid & Thermal Systems 3
ES 204 Mechanical Systems 3
CHEM 111 General Chemistry I 4
HSS Elective 4
  Total 18
     
Spring Term  Credit
MA 223 Statistics for Engineers 4
ES 205 Analysis & Design of 
Engineering Systems
4
CHEM 113 General Chemistry II 4
HSS Elective 4
  Total 16
Junior Year  
Fall Term  Credit
ME 301 Thermodynamics II 4
EM 204  Statics & Mechanics of Materials 4
ME406
  or
EM 406
Control Systems
or
Vibration Analysis
4
*Free Elective 4
  Total 16
     
Winter Term Credit
ME 317 Design for Manufacturing 3
ME 321 

ME 323
Measurement Systems
split winter or spring with
Computer Applications II
4

(2)
Science Elective 4
ME 328 Materials Engineering 4
RH 330
 
HSS
Technical Communications
split winter or spring with
Elective
4
  Total  (17) or 15
     
Spring Term Credit
ME 302 Heat Transfer 4
ME 323  Computer Applications II 2
Science

ME 321
Elective
split winter or spring with
Measurement Systems
4
ME 470 

ME 480
Engineering Design Proc & Method
split Jr. spring or Sr. fall with
Machine Component Design
3

(4)
HSS

RH 330
Elective
split winter or spring with
Technical Communications
 4
  Total (16) or 17
Senior Year  
Fall Term  Credit
ME 430 

ME 421
Mechatronic Systems
split fall or winter with
M.E. Lab and *Tech Elective
 4 

(2+4)
*Tech Elective 4
ME 480
 
ME 470 
Machine Component Design
split Jr. spring or Sr. fall with
Engineering Design Proc & Method
4

(3)
*Tech Elective 4
  Total (17) or 16
     
Winter Term Credit
ME 471 Capstone Design I (3) 3
ME 421 

ME 430
M.E. Lab and *Tech Elective
split fall or winter with
Mechatronic Systems
2+4

(4)
HSS Elective 4
*Free Elective 4
  Total (15) or 17
     
Spring Term Credit
ME 472 Capstone Design II 3
*Tech Elective 4
*Tech Elective 4
HSS Elective 4
  Total 15
  Total credits required: 194

*28 credit hours. in electives composed of 20 cr. hrs. in technical electives and 8 cr. hrs. in free electives.

*A technical elective is any course (at the 200 level or above) in chemistry, computer science, engineering, engineering management, geology, life science, mathematics, or physics that is not cross-listed with HSS or similar in content to a required course. A science elective is any course in applied biology, chemistry, geology or physics except those courses that are cross-referenced with an engineering course.