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Renee Rogge Helps Put Biomedical Engineering Students on Pathways to Success

Friday, January 09, 2015
Renee Rogge teaching a class.

Important Hands-On Experiences: Biomedical Engineering Professor Renee Rogge, PhD, believes students learn best by having hands-on educational experiences. (Photo by Chris Minnick)

Renee Rogge's academic schedule reveals that she's not one to shy away from hard work or giving her students top-notch research and design experiences to explore their interests in biomedical engineering.

For instance, this winter Rogge is helping teach two sections of the institute's senior biomedical engineering capstone engineering design course, with a weekly three-hour laboratory session, along with leading a freshman-level course in mechanics of materials. She also finds time to mentor students on research projects in orthopedics, assistive technologies, and biomechanics.

If that's not enough, Rogge is the co-chair of a biennial national capstone engineering design conference, has co-authored 10 peer-reviewed publications (three with undergraduate co-authors), and had 45 conference presentations and poster sessions (15 with undergraduate co-authors).

This is why Rogge has earned the Board of Trustees' Outstanding Scholar Award, is Rose-Hulman's Samuel F. Hulbert Faculty Chair in Biomedical Engineering, and has received National Science Foundation grants to expand biomechanical instrumentation on campus for undergraduate research projects.

"I like the challenge of bringing out the best in the students and seeing them expand their horizons throughout their college years," says Rogge, a member of the Rose-Hulman faculty since 2004. "There's always something interesting to learn about. It's never boring. You get to see student apply what they're learning.

"Most of my classes include a laboratory component because I firmly believe that students need as much hands-on experiences as possible," she states.

One of those opportunities features students working alongside Rogge on a variety of groundbreaking research projects in the institute's Orthopedic Biomechanics Laboratory, a valuable collaboration with the Joint Replacement Surgeons of Indiana (JSRI) Research Foundation, based at the Center for Hip and Knee Surgery in Mooresville, Indiana. The laboratory, based in Myers Hall, provides undergraduate and graduate engineering students with valuable research opportunities in orthopedics.

Rogge In Lab JRSI

Exploring Orthopedics: As technical director of the Orthopedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Professor Renee Rogge, PhD, has helped several students make discoveries in orthopedics with Indiana's Joint Replacement Surgeons of Indiana Research Foundation. (Photo by James Garber)

Also, as the Samuel F. Hulbert Faculty Chair, Rogge has been fortunate to work with several students during the summer on extended research projects. She also has mentored senior-year biomedical engineering student teams that have earned national awards for workplace innovation and design, and improving opportunities for people with disabilities. Several other teams have completed unique equine therapeutic devices to assist physical therapy clients of Indiana's Hope Haven Horse Farm.

"Rose-Hulman is the place for design in engineering education, and that's a fantastic reputation to have," says Rogge, who worked with several colleagues to develop, implement, and assess the biomedical engineering design curriculum. "Senior capstone projects allow students to connect with the community and improve peoples' lives. A lot of students come here wanting to make a difference. In senior design, you get to see them start that journey."

Professionally, Rogge is considered an expert at experimental testing, computational modeling of bones and orthopedic implants, and sports and impact mechanics.

"The Rose-Hulman students are the best, and I feel very fortunate to play a role in their educational experience," she says. "It's really fun to come to work every day."

Rose-Hulman is the place for design in engineering education, and that's a fantastic reputation to have…Senior capstone projects allow students to connect with the community and improve peoples' lives. A lot of students come here wanting to make a difference. In senior design you get to see them start that journey.

- Renee Rogge, Professor of Biology and Biomedical Engineering

Rogge Profile

Renee Rogge

Faculty Profile: Renee Rogge, PhD

  • Samuel F. Hulbert Faculty Chair in Biomedical Engineering
  • Professor of Biology and Biomedical Engineering
  • Bachelor's Degree, Biomedical Engineering, Tulane University
  • Ph.D, Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa

Areas of Specialization: Biomaterials, biomechanics, upper extremity biomechanics, 3-D whole body modeling, finite element modeling of the distal forearm

Research Activities: Joint Replacement Surgeons of Indiana Laboratory (at Rose-Hulman), educational research in engineering, and development of a realistic whole body model for use in space hardware design

Courses Taught: Biomedical engineering design, statics and mechanics of materials, orthopedic biomechanics, bone biomechanics, graphical communications, biomechanics research, assistive technology research and development, and orthopedic research