Computer Engineers (CPE) are electrical engineers that have additional training in the areas of software design and hardware-software integration. Common CPE tasks include writing embedded software for real-time microcontrollers, designing VLSI chips, working with analog sensors, designing mixed signal circuit boards, and designing operating systems. Computer engineers are also well-suited for research in the field of robotics, which relies on using computers together with other electrical systems. Below is a recommended plan of study for CPE.

Computer Engineering Student Learning Outcomes

The mission statement for the ECE (Electrical & Computer Engineering) Department: To provide students in ECE a rigorous learning experience that prepares them for professional careers.

CPE Student Learning Outcomes: CPE student learning outcomes are designed to instill in our graduates the skills appropriate to their professions and life-long learning. The CPE program uses the term “student learning outcomes” to describe knowledge and skills at the time of graduation that are derived from the objectives.

Holistic Education: Computer Engineering graduates shall be prepared to practice the profession of engineering using a systems perspective broad enough to encompass technological, economic, ethical, environmental, social, and human issues, shall have demonstrated a facility for independent learning, and shall be prepared for continued professional development.

  • H1: Demonstrate a facility for independent learning
  • H2: Be prepared for continued professional development
  • H3: Effective communications skills
  • H4: Contemporary Issues
  • H5: Role of professional in global society

Technical Preparation: Electrical and Computer Engineering graduates shall demonstrate technical depth and breadth in their discipline.

  • T1: General engineering science core plus a discipline-specific technical core
  • T2: Effective use of contemporary tools of the engineering profession

Design & Professional Practice: Computer Engineering graduates shall have participated in design experiences including a comprehensive, industrially-oriented design project, oral presentations, and written communications.

  • D&P: Client sponsored team design experience

Computer Engineering Plan of Study

Freshman Year
Fall Term

Credit

PH 111 Physics I 4
MA 111 Calculus I 5
CLSK 100 College and Life Skills 1
RH 131 Rhetoric & Composition  
        or  
HSS   Elective 4
ECE 160 Engineering Practice 2
      16
       
Winter Term

Credit

PH 112 Physics II 4
MA 112 Calculus II 5
CSSE 120 Introduction to Software Development 4
HSS   Elective  
       or  
RH 131  Rhetoric & Composition..... 4
      17
       
Spring Term

Credit

PH 113 Physics III 4
MA 113 Calculus III 5
ECE 130 Introduction to Logic Design 4
CSSE 220 Object-Oriented Software Development 4
      17
Sophomore Year
Fall Term

Credit

MA 221 Differential Equations & Matrix Algebra I 4
CSSE 232 Computer Architecture I 4
ECE 203 DC Circuits 4
CHEM 105 Engineering Chemistry I
      16
       
Winter Term

Credit

MA 222 Differential Equations &    Matrix Algebra II 4
CSSE 332

Operating Systems

4

ECE 204 AC Circuits 4
HSS   Elective 4
      16
       
Spring Term

Credit

MA 381 Introduction to Probability    with Applications to Statistics 4
ECE 250 Electronic Device Modeling 4
ECE 205 Dynamical Systems 4
HSS   Elective 4
     

16

       
Junior Year
Fall Term

Credit

MA 275 Discrete & Combinational Algebra I 4
ECE 351 Analog Electronics 4
ECE 333 Digital Systems 4
RH 330

Technical and Professional Communication

4

      16
Winter Term

Credit

ECE 300 Signals & Systems 4
ECE 331 Embedded System Design 4
ECE 332 Computer Architecture II 4
    Math/Science Elective 4
      16
       
Spring Term

Credit

ECE 380 Discrete Time & Continuous Systems 4
ECE 342 Introduction to Electromagnetic Compatibility 4
ECE 362 Principles of Design 3
HSS     4
     

15

       
Senior Year
Fall Term

Credit

ECE 460 Engineering Design I 3
    Tech Elective 4
    Area Elective 4
HSS   Elective 4
     

15

       
Winter Term

Credit

ECE 461 Engineering Design II 4
    Tech Elective 4
    Area Elective 4
HSS   Elective 4
     

16

       
Spring Term

Credit

ECE 462 Engineering Design III 2
    Area Elective 4
HSS   Elective 4
    Free Elective 4
    Free Elective 4
     

18

       
   

Total credits required:  194

     
 

Area Electives

An area elective course is:

  1. Any course bearing an ECE prefix at the 400 level or above.
  2. All area electives must bear an ECE prefix at the 400 level or above.

Tech Elective

  • Any course NOT bearing a GS, RH, IA, SV, GE, JP, and SP prefix

Notes

  1. MA 351-356 Problem Solving Seminar may not be combined and substituted for the math elective.
  2. CPE majors are not permitted to take ECE 206 Elements of Electrical Engineering, or ECE 207 Electrical Engineering as free electives or technical electives. Free electives may be selected from any other Rose-Hulman courses.
  3. CPE majors may take any additional math, biology, chemistry, or physics course as a science elective except those courses that are cross-referenced with any engineering courses.

Computer Engineering Core Courses

Course Number Course Title Credits
ECE130 Introduction to Logic Design 4
ECE160 Engineering Practice 2
ECE203 DC Circuits 4
ECE204 AC Circuits 4
ECE205 Dynamical Systems 4
ECE250 Electronic Device Modeling 4
ECE300 Signals & Systems 4
ECE331 Embedded System Design 4
ECE332 Computer Architecture II 4
ECE333 Digital Systems 4
ECE342 Introduction to Electromagnetic Compatibility 4
ECE351 Analog Electronics 4
ECE362 Principles of Design 3
ECE380 Discrete Time & Continuous Systems 4
ECE460 Engineering Design I 3
ECE461 Engineering Design II 4
ECE462 Engineering Design III 2

Second Major in Computer Engineering

The ECE Department will not allow the following second major combinations:

  1. Degree in Electrical Engineering and a Second Major in Computer Engineering.
  2. Degree in Computer Engineering and a Second Major in Electrical Engineering.

Other students outside of ECE can get a second major in CPE by completing all of the courses in a required plan.

CPE Second Major
Course Number Course Name Credit
ECE 130 Introduction to Logic Design 4
ECE 203 DC Circuits 4
ECE 204 AC Circuits 4
ECE 205 Dynamical Systems 4
ECE 250 Electronic Device Modeling 4
ECE 300 Signals & Systems 4
ECE 331 Embedded System Design 4
ECE 332 Computer Architecture II 4
ECE 333 Digital Systems 4
ECE 342 Introduction to Electromagnetic Compatibility 4
ECE 351 Analog Electronics 4
ECE 380 Discrete Time & Continuous Systems 4
CSSE 120 Introduction to Software Development 4
CSSE 220 Object-Oriented Software Development 4
CSSE 232 Computer Architecture I 4
CSSE 332 Operating Systems 4
Total 64

Area Minor in Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)

The Area Minor in ECE is designed to allow students to add another dimension to their Rose-Hulman degree.

Advisor Dr. Fred Berry

Requirements for Area Minor in ECE

  • ECE203
  • ECE204
  • Plus four additional ECE courses, except EC160, ECE361, ECE362, ECE460, ECE461, ECE462, ECE466, ECE206, and ECE207

Example Area Minor for Physics and Optical Engineering

Course Number Course Title Credits
ECE203 Required DC Circuits 4
ECE204 Required AC Circuits 4
ECE205 Dynamical Systems 4
ECE300 Signals and Systems 4
ECE380 Discrete Time and Continuous Systems 4
ECE310 Communication Systems 4

Example Area Minor for Computer Science and Software Engineering

Course Number Course Title Credits
ECE130 Introduction to logic Design 4
ECE203 Required DC Circuits 4
ECE204 Required AC Circuits 4
ECE250 Electronic Device Modeling 4
ECE332 Computer Architecture II 4
ECE333 Digital Systems 4

Example Area Minor for Mechanical Engineering

Course Number Course Title Credits
ECE203 Required DC Circuits 4
ECE204 Required AC Circuits 4
ECE370 Power & Energy Systems  4
ECE371 Sustainable Energy Systems 4
ECE470 Power Systems I 4
ECE471 Industrial Power Systems 4

Optical Communications Certificate

Faculty advisors: B. Black and S. Granieri

Rose-Hulman has become a leader in providing opportunities for students to choose a great mainstream degree program with flexibility to specialize in other areas of interest. This leadership is in no way limited to only traditional areas of study. One of these new areas that had a high impact in technology is optical communications. It is a rapidly growing field requiring investment beyond the traditional program structure, and is well suited to the students at Rose-Hulman All these topics are closely related to well established disciplines as optics and electronics. Considerable R&D efforts are allocated in both university and industrial laboratories enhancing the demand for both researchers and engineers with expertise in the field.

We propose the creation of a new certificate program in Optical Communications to enhance the programs currently offered. Combining expertise in Optical and Electrical Engineering, this program requires an interdisciplinary emphasis that is beyond the traditional content of either of its parent programs. This program is more than just the creation of the certificate program Optical Communications. This program will be critical to help developing a more interdisciplinary interaction for students and faculty. The creation of a workgroup within the faculty of both departments will coordinate current courses and resources, create new courses of interest for the field, and develop a showcase testbed education and research laboratory. Primary objectives include the removal of redundancy from existing courses, increasing interaction between the PHOE and ECE departments, and improving opportunities for students in the field.

This certificate is designed to give the student a firm theoretical and practical working knowledge in the area of fiber optic devices, optical communications, networks and its applications. The main purpose is to couch these fundamentals in a context that serves as the backbone for device, components and sub-system development for use in high-speed optical data and information links and networks. At the end of the program the student will be expected to:

  1. Understand the fundamental operation characteristics of high speed optoelectronic components, such as laser transmitters, light modulators and receivers and passive fiber optic components as connectors, couplers, filters, and switches.
  2. Understand the technology and performance of analog and digital fiber optic links, optical amplification and optical wavelength division multiplexing and optical time division multiplexing networks.
  3. Have a hands-on working knowledge of the use of fiber optic test equipment and techniques used by industry and telecommunication companies to test the performance of optical fiber links and components, such as, optical time domain reflectometry, optical spectrum analyzers and optical bit error testing equipment.

The Certificate will consist of 20 credit hours of which 12 credit hours will be required courses. Students interested in pursuing this Certificate should contact an ECE/PHOE certificate advisor (Professors Black, Bunch, and Granieri)

Required Courses

  • ECE 310 Communication Systems
  • OE 393 Fiber Optics and Applications
  • OE 493 Fundamentals of Optical Fiber Communications

Elective Courses (two from the list)
Only courses not required for the student’s major will count for electives in the certificate.

  • ECE 380 Discrete Time & Continuous Systems
  • ECE 410 Communication Networks
  • ECE 414 Wireless System
  • OE 360 Optical Materials and Opto-mechanics
  • OE 435 Biomedical Optics
  • OE 450 Laser Systems and Applications
  • OE 485 Electro-Optics and Applications