AREAS OF STUDY  
Global Studies Ideas and Arts
Society and Values Modern Languages
MAJORS  
International Studies (second major only) Economics
GERMAN TECHNICAL TRANSLATION CERTIFICATE
MINORS  
Anthropology Japanese
Art Language and Literature
East Asian Studies Latin American Studies
Economics Music
European Studies Political Science
Geography Philosophy and Religion
German Psychology
History Spanish

PROFESSORS Bremmer, Brophy, Carlson, Carvill, Casey, Christ, Clark, Dyer, Garcia, Gardner, Heeter, Hirotani, House, Kim, Kukral, Kuo, Letsinger, Livingston, Luegenbiehl, Martland, Mason, Michel, Minster, Schumacher, Smith, Taylor, Turner, Watt, and Williams.

MISSION STATEMENT

To enable our students to become creative, sophisticated thinkers, active citizens, and effective leaders in the global community, the department contributes to a broad liberal education, introducing students to a wide array of disciplines and traditions in the humanities and social sciences. In doing so, it provides learning experiences that, in addition to their intrinsic value, enrich a scientific and technical education.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Within the context of a liberal education, the department fosters in its students the desire and the ability to:

think critically, forming cogent, informed opinions, defining and solving problems with an awareness that societal processes are complex and interactive;

communicate effectively to diverse audiences, including those from other cultures and communities;

succeed in a global context by understanding and adapting to diverse cultures, alternative points of view, and the challenges of globalization;

exhibit ethical and responsible leadership as individuals, citizens, and professionals, committed to lifelong learning and achievement.

DISCIPLINES

The HUMANITIES study what it means to be human within a contemporary or historical context. These disciplines analyze the ideas and expressive artifacts of individuals or groups emphasizing qualitative rather than quantitative methods. The Humanities provide us with the broad frameworks within which enduring questions of existence, relationships, values, and aesthetics can be examined from multiple perspectives.

The SOCIAL SCIENCES study human interactions and the social institutions in which these occur. These disciplines tend to adopt scientific methods, emphasizing quantitative rather than qualitative approaches. The Social Sciences provide us with the broad frameworks within which to analyze the nature of social systems, processes, and outcomes.

The following disciplines are represented within the department:

HUMANITIES

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Art

Anthropology

English and Literature

Economics

Foreign Languages (German, Japanese, and Spanish)

Geography

History

Political Science

Music 

Psychology

Philosophy and Religion

Sociology

Thematic Categories

The majority of courses offered by the department are distributed across three thematic categories. These are:

Global Studies (GS prefix): Courses whose primary focus is on the examination of other societies, or on the interrelationships among multiple societies.

Ideas and Arts (IA prefix): Courses whose primary focus is on theories and debates within disciplines, the development of ideas, or arts and aesthetics.

Society and Values (SV prefix): Courses whose primary focus is on the dynamics, patterns, and values of human interaction and social institutions.

In addition, courses related to communication skills and foreign languages have their own designations:

  • Rhetoric and Composition (required of all students, with the exception noted below) and Technical Communications are designated with an RH prefix. Rhetoric and Composition is RH 131 and Technical Communications is RH 330
  • Foreign language courses are identified by prefixes which identify the language: GE for German, JP for Japanese, and SP for Spanish

COURSE LEVELS IN THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

The courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences Department are intended to contribute to our students’ broad liberal education. Given this, they frequently do not follow a sequence or require prerequisites. This does not mean, however, that there is no distinction between upper and lower level courses.In general lower level courses (100 and 200 level) tend to be broad surveys of particular subject areas within disciplines.Upper level courses (300 and 400 level) are often more focused in terms of subject matter and may go into greater depth of content.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

1. General 
All students must take a minimum of nine courses (36 credits) in Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS). These courses may be chosen from the HSS offerings, within the restrictions below. (A student taking an area minor in HSS must take a minimum of ten to eleven courses; see below.)

2. Rhetoric and Composition 
All students, with the exception noted below, are required to take RH 131, Rhetoric and Composition, on campus. Freshmen, unless exempted or taking a foreign language, are normally enrolled automatically in the course in either the Fall or Winter Quarter. Students who have taken a writing course at another college will be granted IA transfer credit, but are not exempted from RH 131.

EXEMPTION: An entering student (freshman or transfer) who meets both of the following requirements may be exempt from the RH 131 requirement. The student will not, however, be awarded credit for RH 131. Any HSS course may be substituted for RH 131 for exempted students.

  1. A combined score of 1500 or above on the Writing and Critical Reading sections of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or of 34 or above on the English section of the ACT exam.
  2. Has received grades of B or higher in all high school English courses.

3. Distribution Requirements 
All students will take two courses in each of the three thematic categories: Global Studies, Ideas and Arts, and Society and Values. The section of course descriptions lists courses currently available in each category. Students are also required to take one additional course in any category OR two additional courses in any category IF Technical Communication is not required of any of the student’s majors. Technical communication may be taken as one of the additional courses if not required by the student’s major(s).

4. Foreign Language 
Students who elect to take a foreign language should note the following special requirements.

  1. HSS credit will not be awarded for an introductory-level language class (GE111, JP111, or SP111) until the student takes and passes the following course in the language sequence.
  2. Students who take 2-3 courses in a foreign language sequence may allocate those language courses in any of the three thematic categories as they choose, but may have no more than one language course in any category. In other words, the student must still take at least one course in each thematic category in a discipline other than foreign language and must also take RH 131. If a fourth foreign language course is counted toward the general HSS requirements, it will count as the one additional course noted under the Distribution Requirements.
  3. Students who take twelve courses (four years) in a single language are exempted from RH 131 and from both courses in Global Studies.
  4. Students may not earn foreign language credit in their native languages.

Note: Students planning to study abroad should be sure to have their program approved ahead of time by the head of the HSS Department and by the head of the Department in which they are majoring.

5. Minors 
Students may elect a minor in most of the HSS Department’s disciplines. In addition, several interdisciplinary minors are available. (See below.)

Help with Requirements
Students having questions concerning these requirements should consult their advisers or the head of the HSS Department. A check sheet summarizing HSS graduation requirements is available in the HSS Department Office.

Minor
A student may elect to take an Minor in Anthropology, East Asian Studies, Economics, European Studies, Geography, German, History, Japanese, Language and Literature, Latin American Studies Philosophy and Religion, Political Science, Psychology, or Spanish, by concentrating 5 to 7 HSS courses in that area. NOTE: All Minors require taking one additional HSS course, for a minimum of 40 HSS credits (44 in the case of foreign languages). See the specific requirements listed under each Minor. Successful completion of the Minor is indicated on the student’s grade transcript. A student interested in pursuing a Minor should consult with the appropriate Minor Adviser, listed below, for aid in planning a course schedule. No courses counted toward fulfilling the requirements for one minor may be counted in fulfilling the requirements of another minor.

Minor Advisor
Anthropology Scott Clark
Art Steve Letsinger
East Asian Studies Huei-Ying Kuo
Economics Dale S. Bremmer
  Kevin Christ
  Jong Hun Kim
European Studies Andreas Michel
German Heidemarie Heeter
Geography Michael A. Kukral
History Samuel Martland
Japanese Maki Hirotani
Language and Literature Caroline Carvill
Music Gary Turner
Latin American Studies Gustavo Garcia
Philosophy and Religion Heinz Luegenbiehl
Political Science Terrence Casey
Psychology Patrick D. Brophy
Spanish John Gardner

Courses Offered

Global Studies

Courses whose primary focus is on the examination of other societies, or on the interrelationships among multiple societies.

GS 128 Introduction to East Asian History 4R-OL-4C
Examine the changing political-economic and cultural orders in the East Asian region (including China, Japan, and Korea) from imperial to modern era.

GS 161 Comparative Politics 4R-OL-4C
Examines the politics and government of numerous countries around the world. Explores the concepts and principles of comparative political analysis.

GS 163 International Relations 4R-OL-4C
Analyzes the structures, actors, and major problems of the international political system. 

GS 191 Geography of Middle East 4R-OL-4C
Introduces the culture, landscape, and peoples of the Middle East and North Africa through discussion, maps, regional analysis, and visual presentations. Includes social issues and contemporary problems facing this area, from Afghanistan to Mauritania and all points between.

GS 207 Asian Religions and Philosophy 4R-OL-4C
Focuses on the thought systems of India, China, and Japan.  Discusses Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto.

GS 221 Colonial Latin America 4R-OL-4C
Examines the history of Latin America from before the conquest to independence, with particular emphasis on social, economic, political, and cultural developments between 1492 and 1800.

GS 222  Modern Latin America 4R-OL-4C
Examines the history of Latin America from independence (about 1810) to the present, with particular emphasis on the social, economic, political, and cultural developments of the past hundred years. Introduces major problems facing contemporary Latin America, including the search for stable government, political violence, environmental degradation, and extreme poverty and inequality.

GS 223 World History 4R-OL-4C
Explores the history and interaction of major world regions, with particular emphasis on the development of global economic, political, and cultural networks in recent centuries.

GS 237 Science Fiction 4R-OL-4C
Analyzes literary techniques used for displacing historical reality into a cross-cultural perspective to create science fiction. Emphasizes science fiction’s humanistic usefulness in examining human values from an “extra-species, extra-terrestrial” perspective and in assessing the effects of technology on varieties of belief structures and social institutions.

GS 285 Humans and Culture 4R-OL-4C
Examines human adaptation and diversity; language and its use; the development and variety of economic, political, religious, family gender and expressive institutions.

GS 291 World Geography 4R-OL-4C
Explores the people and lands of the world through studies and concepts from human geography with emphasis on cultural landscape,, maps, and visual interpretation. Emphasis is placed on the culture regions of Africa, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and the South Pacific.

GS 313 Contemporary Spain 4R-OL-4C
Introduces historical, political, and above all cultural issues in Spanish society, beginning with an overview of Spain prior to the twentieth century, but concentrating on the period from 1975 to the present. Special emphasis on the unique characteristics of Catalonia, Galicia and the Basque Country. Taught in English.

GS 324  Gender and Work in China 4R-OL-4C
Examine Chinese women’s economic roles against the background of modern world history and China's transformation from 1600 to 2000.

GS 327 Modern China 4R-OL-4C
Examine the divergent responses to western challenges among the Chinese intellectuals, women, and urban bourgeoisie between the nineteenth to the first half of the twentieth centuries.

GS 334 Travel in World Literature 4R-OL-4C
Examines a wide variety of literature—including some in translation—and emphasizes works that comment on travel, tourism, and the effects of colonialism.

GS 335 The Global Novel in the Twentieth Century 4R-OL-4C
Explores novels, written in or translated into English, by non-American authors.  Provides students with multiple perspectives on different global cultures.

GS 336 Literature of War 4R-OL-4C
Examines the influence of military engagements on individual writers. Analyzes literary works as responses to the cultural, psychological, and social impacts of war.

GS 337 Shakespeare's Europe 4R-OL-4C
Studies Shakespeare's representations of cultures outside of Britain, with attention to his source texts in other national literatures and historians' perspectives on the cities where the plays are set.

GS 338 Contemporary Arabic Literature in Translation 4R-OL-4C
Covers a range of literature and film by writers and filmmakers from North Africa, the Middle East, and the Arabic-speaking diaspora.  Includes literature in translation by major authors of this genre and critical works by a number of scholars of Arabic literature.

GS 350 International Trade and Globalization 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Analyzes the theory of international trade, trade policy, foreign exchange and the payments adjustment process, adjustment policies and multinational corporations.

GS 351 International Finance 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Studies the workings of international financial markets, the role of exchange rates in international trade and capital movement, and the effects of exchange rate volatility. Topics include exchange rates and the foreign exchange market, the balance of payments, parity conditions, the international monetary system, and international interdependence.

GS 352 Economic Growth and Development 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Analyzes the determinants of economic growth. Pays special attention to problems faced by developing nations and discusses the impact of globalization.

GS 361 Politics of the Global Economy 4R-OL-4C
Analyzes the political aspects of the global economy. Reviews the dominant theoretical approaches, concepts, and major issues in the international political economy.

GS 363 European Politics and Government 4R-OL-4C
Examines the ideology, culture, political processes, institutions, and public policy of selected European political systems.

GS 366 The European Union 4R-OL-4C
Examines the historical development of European integration and current EU institutions, politics, and policy.

GS 368  Contemporary Japan (Field trip to Japan) 4R-OL-4C
Examine contemporary Japan through the lectures, reading, and discussions during the course. Explorer the culture through the field trip to Japan.

GS 379  Japanese Culture 4R-OL-4C
Examine Japanese culture in various aspects (e.g., society, arts, history, education, media, and pop culture).

GS 384  Japanese Society 4R-OL-4C
Examines the context within which individual Japanese live and work in contemporary Japanese society. Considers the “traditional” roots of Japan, the impact of industrialization, and current trends. Emphasizes the change and continuity in Japanese life, including the family and marriage, rural and urban lifestyles, education, and the organization of management and labor.

GS 391 Contemporary Europe 4R-OL-4C
Surveys the changes and dynamics confronting Europe in the 20th Century. The dissolution of empires and communism to the expanding European Union will be examined with maps, theories and concepts from political geography. Ethics and values related to territoriality, place, and culture will be examined.

GS 412 Topics in German Culture II 4R-OL-4C
Explores topics in German and European intellectual history as represented in literature, essay, and film. Same as GE412.

GS 422  Industrial Revolution in Global Context 4R-OL-4C
Examines the changes in production, distribution, and consumption commonly known as the Industrial Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries. Explores technological, economic, social, and cultural aspects of these changes, both in industrialized countries and in other parts of the world.

GS 431 Literary London 4R-OL-4C
Considers literary depictions of London, a highly symbolic and frequently used setting in 19th, 20th, and 21st century British literature.  Covers a broad range of literary texts set in the city, including works by major authors of this genre and a number of recent works by ethnic minority writers.   

GS 432  Literature and Film of the Global Economy 4R-OL-4C
Focuses on contemporary fictional and non-fictional narratives that address economic interdependence between nation states.   Employs an interdisciplinary approach to contextualize these narratives.

GS 442 Art History: Renaissance to Modern 4R-OL-4C
Explores the creation and uses of visual art by world civilizations from the Renaissance to the present.   Studies the cultural evolution brought about by scientific and technological changes which culminate in the Modern and Post-Modern eras.

GS 462 Postcolonial Literature 4R-OL-4C
Examines works by postcolonial writers and theorists, and covers contemporary human rights and anti-colonial/anti-globalization movements.

GS 469 Contemporary British Fiction and Film 4R-OL-4C
Covers fiction and film produced in the British Isles during the last half of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century, including works by both canonical and non-canonical authors.  Includes readings about a number of pressing issues in contemporary Britain, and focuses on literary responses to race and class concerns. 

GS 491 Geography of Europe 4R-OL-4C
Introduces the culture, landscape, and peoples of Europe through discussion, maps, regional analysis, and visual presentations. Includes social issues and contemporary problems facing the Europeans, from Russia to Ireland and all points between.

GS 492 Geography of Africa 4R-OL-4C
Introduces the culture, landscape, and peoples of Africa south of the Sahara Desert through discussion, maps, regional analysis, and visual presentations. Includes social issues and contemporary problems facing this area, from South Africa to Senegal and all points between.

Ideas and Arts

Courses whose primary focus is on theories and debates within disciplines, the development of ideas, or arts and aesthetics.

IA 101 Introduction to Philosophy 4R-OL-4C
Introduces the student to the methods and subject matter of philosophy through a selective consideration of fundamental philosophical problems such as the nature of reality, the existence of God, the criteria of knowing, and the basis of morality.

IA 142 Drawing 4R-OL-4C
Introduces the student to drawing as a basis of personal expression.  Exposes the student to a range of tools, techniques, and attitudes.

IA 148 Beginning Photography 4R-OL-4C
Introduces the student to historical aspects of photography, the impact of the visual image in modern culture, and photography as a medium of individual expression.

IA 230 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 4R-OL-4C
Examines the thought processes necessary to organize speech content. Analyzes components of effective delivery and language. Provides practice in a variety of speech types, such as special occasion speeches, informative presentations, and persuasive speeches, as well as impromptu speaking.

IA 231 Introduction to Poetry 4R-OL-4C
Provides students with the means for understanding and appreciating poetry. Focuses on tone, speaker, figurative language, verse forms, and structure in poems from a variety of historical periods.

IA 232 African American Music in American Literature 4R-OL-4C
Surveys the history of African-American music, from slavery to the present, and considers the ways in which writers have adapted different musical styles into their work.  Includes--but is not limited to--readings on spirituals, blues, jazz, funk, and hip-hop; written works will include nonfiction, novels, poetry, short stories, and drama. 

IA 233 World Literatures 4R-OL-4C
Examines literary texts and their historical contexts across boundaries of language, culture, and ethnicity. 

IA 234 Major American Writers 4R-OL-4C
Covers a broad range of American novelists and poets, with special attention to their roles in major literary movements such as romanticism, naturalism, and modernism.

IA 235 Major British Writers 4R-OL-4C
Examines well-known British writers, placed against the historical backgrounds of their times. Poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction from such famous writers as Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Wordsworth, Bronte, Browning, Joyce, Lawrence, Auden, and Beckett will be studied.

IA 236 Jane Austen and the Rhetoric of Fiction 4R-OL-4C
Provides a guide to reading, appreciating, and analyzing Jane Austen’s major novels. Analyzes a variety of film adaptations, comparing them to the novels in their rhetorical effects.

IA 237 Introduction to Drama 4R-OL-4C
Traces the development of drama by analyzing representative plays from historical periods and from different cultures. Analyzes how, and why, drama has changed over time and how individual plays mirror their times and cultures.

IA 238 African American Literature 4R-OL-4C
Surveys African-American literature, history, and culture from the Colonial era to the present day.

IA 239  Rhetoric of Science 4R-OL-4C
Examines rhetorical and philosophical approaches to persuasion in scientific argument. Emphasizes popular science writing and the role played by science in shaping public opinion and policy.

IA 240  Introduction to Shakespeare 4R-OL-4C
Studies Shakespeare’s histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances.  Focuses on close textual reading of selected plays within the intellectual framework of his era.

IA 241  Introduction to Film Studies 4R-OL-4C
Covers the formal elements of film and provides a vocabulary for analyzing film. Introduces film theory and criticism.

IA 244 Design and Color 4R-OL-4C
Explores visual design and communication, creative problem solving, color theory and aesthetics.  Students engage in problem-solving to create projects using a variety of materials.

IA 246 Music Theory I: Concepts 4R-OL-4C
Teaches basic techniques of music notation and analysis of melody, harmony, rhythm, form, and style. Includes a comprehensive Analysis Project.

IA 302 Philosophy of Religion 4R-OL-4C
Examines the basic philosophical problems found in religion. Deals specifically with the nature of religion, the nature and existence of God, religious language, and the religious life.

IA 311 Topics in German Culture I 4R-OL-4C
Examines a variety of historical and contemporary issues in German popular and high culture. Same as GE311.

IA 330  Documentary Film 4R-OL-4C
Examines the development, contexts, generic conventions, and social functions of documentary film

IA 331 American Modernism 4R-OL-4C
Explores texts published in the first half of the twentieth century, what is commonly called the "Modernist" era.  Focuses primarily on written works in different genres, but also covers music, film, visual arts, and other media.

IA 332 Don Quixote 4R-OL-4C
Studies Cervantes’ masterwork in translation and its relationship to the society and literature of its day as well as its relevance to our own. Taught in English.

IA 333 Representations and Redefinitions of Reality 4R-OL-4C
Examines representative pieces of philosophy, literature, and popular culture that all seek to represent and--in some cases--redefine the notion of "reality."

IA 334 Creative Writing 4R-OL-4C
Introduces students to writing in genres such as poetry, short fiction, literary nonfiction, and drama.  Employs a variety of writing and revision techniques to assist students in producing a portfolio of their work.

IA 335  Bible as Literature 4R-OL-4C
Examines the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament as literary texts. Emphasizes the variety of genres employed in biblical literature and introduces students to different approaches appropriate to literary interpretation.

IA 336 Mystery & Horror Literature 4R-OL-4C
Examines the development, contexts, generic conventions, and social functions of modern horror and detective fiction from their roots in European Gothic traditions to the present.

IA 337 European Romanticism 4R-OL-4C
Covers major authors and themes in European Romantic literature from 1770-1830, as well as its repercussions and transformations.

IA 339  Rebellion in American Literature 4R-OL-4C
Examines American literary and historical texts that use rebellion against different kinds of authority--governmental, social, cultural, artistic, personal--as their central subject, motif, and / or theme.  Includes readings from the Colonial era to the present day.

IA 346 Music Theory II: Applications 4R-OL-4C
Pre: IA246 or consent of instructor. Applies notational and analytical techniques to arranging/composing tasks, using music notation software.

IA 348 Music Performance 1R-0L-1R
Pre: Consent of Instructor.  Applies music skills in performance groups for music minors.  May be repeated up to 4 hours.

IA 350 Intermediate Microeconomics 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Analyzes optimal choice, and the conditions required for efficient exchange in market economies. Emphasizes rational choice theory as it applies to consumers and businesses, with complementary examination of uncertainty, anomalous features of actual market behavior.

IA 351 Intermediate Macroeconomics 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Studies the economy as a whole, including factors affecting economic growth, unemployment and inflation. Explains economic events and considers how policies affect economic performance.

IA 352 Game Theory 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Introduces techniques used to solve strategic games encountered in business and economics. Analyzes behavior of economic agents in various situations including single and repeated games with perfect and imperfect information.

IA 353 History of Economic Thought 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Surveys the history of economic thought and examines the literature of economics from rhetorical, historical, and methodological perspectives using original sources.

IA 388 Chinese Nationalism 4R-OL-4C
Examine issues and debates surrounding the discussion on Chinese nationalism.

IA 431 History of the American Novel 4R-OL-4C
Studies the novel in America from its early examples into the present. Emphasizes influential novels with historical and societal impact, placing more recent novels into historical context.

IA 436 Reinterpretations of Literary Themes 4R-OL-4C
Examines pieces of literature which rework the themes, characters and/or plots of other works to show how different authors from different times and cultures reinterpret earlier works in their own way.

IA 450 Mathematical Economics 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Illustrates the use of mathematics in economic analysis. Includes discussion of mathematical programming, decision theory, the applications of differential and integral calculus, differential and difference equations.

IA 453 The Entrepreneur 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Describes the role of the entrepreneur and in small and large businesses.  Uses economic analysis to study entrepreneurship and prepare business plans. Includes an application to a simulated entrepreneurial effort by the students.

IA 471 Literature of Madness 4R-OL-4C
Analyzes the literary, biographical, and scientific relationships between artistic and manic-depressed temperaments. Examines how “great wits and madness” relate.

Society and Values

Courses whose primary focus is on the dynamics, patterns, and values of human interaction and social institutions.

SV 134 Popular Literature 4R-OL-4C
Analyzes texts written for mass consumption, such as detective novels, horror stories, fantasy fiction, and contemporary thrillers. Explores these literary genres’ conventions, traditions, and sociohistorical contexts.

SV 151 Principles of Economics 4R-OL-4C
Includes both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Analyzes market behavior. Considers production and pricing decisions under alternative industrial structures. Examines the determinants of economic growth, unemployment and inflation, including fiscal and monetary policy.

SV 166 American Politics and Government 4R-OL-4C
Examines the ideology, culture, political processes, institutions, and public policy of the American democratic system.

SV 171 Principles of Psychology 4R-OL-4C
Surveys learning, motivation, personality, intelligence, abnormal behavior, social behavior, perception, emotion, and psychobiology. Stresses objective analysis of behavior and provides a foundation for advanced courses.

SV 191 Cultural Geography 4R-OL-4C
Explores themes, topics, and concepts in cultural geography studies with examples from a diversity of world areas. Included are studies and examples from language, religion, settlement, ethnicity, agriculture, urbanization, population, and popular culture.

SV 201 Religion and Ecology  4R-OL-4C
Examines religious and cultural beliefs, texts, and practices relating to the natural world, focusing primarily on historical transvaluations of the concept of nature.

SV 222 Western Civilization to 1500 4R-OL-4C
Introduces the origins and growth of ideologies and institutions that have shaped Western Civilization from the first sedentary societies until the first contact between Europe and the Americas.  Emphasizes the development of society, religion, the economy, government, science, and technology.

SV 223 Western Civilization since 1500 4R-OL-4C
Introduces the development of ideologies and institutions that have shaped Western Civilization from the beginning of European colonialism to the Cold War, globalization, and the present day.  Emphasizes changes in society, religion, government, the economy, and the impact of science and technology on daily life.

SV 226 The West in the East 4R-OL-4C
Analyze how the changing images of the West in China reflect China’s changing status in the global economy.

SV 231 Introduction to Short Fiction 4R-OL-4C
Guides students in reading, appreciating, and analyzing a range of short fiction. Gives special attention to how reading such fiction can help us better understand ourselves and our relationships to the societies in which we live.

SV 232 Introduction to Non-Fiction 4R-OL-4C
Guides students in learning about human interactions by reading, appreciating, and analyzing contemporary non-fiction works. Includes both general essays and science and nature writing. 

SV 233 Survey of American Lit 4R-OL-4C
Studies a broad range of American literature since the Civil War. Examines a variety of authors and genres (fiction, poetry, prose, nonfiction).

SV 234  The American Dream 4R-OL-4C
Analyzes representations of the American Dream in fictional and non-fictional narratives through a cultural studies approach.

SV 242 Visual Arts in Civilization 4R-OL-4C
Investigates the purposes and uses of art in civilizations with an emphasis on art appreciation.  Aesthetic and historical issues are explored to reveal how art makes worldviews tangible.

SV 244 Music History: Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque 4R-OL-4C
Surveys the music periods through reading, listening, and a research project.

SV 245 Music History: Classical, Romantic, Modern 4R-OL-4C
Surveys the music periods through reading, listening, and a research project.

SV 272 Experimental Psychology 4R-OL-4C
Emphasizes experimental analysis of perception, motivation, learning, and personality. Programmed and independent experiments are performed. Laboratory periods are arranged.

SV 288 Introduction to Sociology 4R-OL-4C
Examine the social and historical construction of our personal identity based on race, class, and gender as well as how social and global inequality is associated with these categories.

SV 291 Medieval Europe 4R-OL-4C
Explores the settlement, state and nation building, trade, innovation, and peopling of Europe from the age of Vandals, Goths, and Vikings to the Renaissance. Emphasizes wars, revolts, power and society in transforming the map of Europe through studies of historical geography.

SV 303  Business and Engineering Ethics 4R-OL-4C
Examines the ethical issues faced by professional engineers in the global corporate context.  Deals with such topics as codes of ethics, professional autonomy, employer authority, and whistle blowing.

SV 304 Bioethics 4R-OL-4C
Introduces students to basic issues in bioethics such as physician-patient relationships, the conduct of research, cross-cultural concerns, and codes of ethics.

SV 322 Disasters and Modern Society  4R-OL-4C
Examines how people at different times and places have tried to explain and prevent natural and technological disasters, and how those disasters have influenced the development of modern society.  Explores how societies have thought about nature and technology, measured costs in lives and property, and perceived obligations between rich and poor. 

SV 325 Cities in Latin American History 4R-OL-4C
Examines the evolution of cities and urban life in Latin America since before 1500.  Specific topics vary but will include some of the following:  technology, architecture, daily life, government, mass politics, and violence.

SV 326 Overseas Chinese 4R-OL-4C
Examine theories about trading diasporas, the construction of ethnic others in nationalist discourses as well as historiographies on Chinese overseas migration from early modern to contemporary period.

SV 328 Comparative Business History 4R-OL-4C
Explore how culture matters to business organizations and the notion of entrepreneurship.

SV 332  Masculinity and Work in Fiction and Film 4R-OL-4C
Examines representations of maculinity in the workplace in literature, film, and popular culture, as well as the intersection of masculinity with topics such as technology, race, and class from U.S. industrialization to the present.

SV 334 Utopian Thought and Literature 4R-OL-4C
Studies varieties of utopian thought from a cross-cultural perspective.

SV 336 Contemporary American Fiction  4R-OL-4C
Analyzes the evolution of the American novel since 1945, with an emphasis on the historical context of late 20th-century American culture.

SV 337 20th-Century American Novel 4R-OL-4C
Examines the American novel with representatives of the major 20th century literary periods: realism, modernism, postmodernism. Examines the themes and issues addressed in different decades and from different perspectives.

SV 338 Latin American Fiction: The Boom and Beyond 4R-OL-4C
Studies writers associated with the “Boom” in Latin American fiction (the expanded popularity beginning in the 1960’s), along with their literary predecessors and descendents. Examines the relationship between literature and cultural context.

SV 339 Literature and the Environment  4R-OL-4C
Considers the relationship between art and the natural world. Readings may include myths and poems, travel and adventure narratives, activist projects and manifestoes, and scientific and philosophical essays, drawn from a variety of cultural traditions.

SV 350 Managerial Accounting 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Covers accounting concepts and procedures for preparation of financial reporting.  Emphasizes use of accounting as a tool for management control and decision making.

SV 351 Managerial Economics 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Applies economic analysis to the management of modern business enterprise. Emphasizes demand estimation, business forecasting, uncertainty, investment decisions, capital budgeting, and pricing strategies. In addition to SL 151, students should have some knowledge of business statistics.

SV 352 Money and Banking 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Examines the nature and functions of financial markets and institutions. Analyzes the determination of interest rates and the processing of information. Considers the relationship between the financial system and the macroeconomy.

SV 353 Industrial Organization  4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Examines the influence of market structure and competition policy on business firms’ decisions. Discusses modern theories of the firm, implications of market power, strategic interaction, merger and acquisition activity, antitrust policy and regulation.

SV 354  Environmental Economics  4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Analyzes the consequences of pollution and discusses possible solutions to reduce pollution. Introduces analytical tools used in environmental planning. Performs benefit-cost analyses of regulations dealing with air, water, and solid waste pollution.

SV 355 Health Economics 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Analyzes demand and supply of health care and the roles of medical technology and health insurance. Studies the behavior of physicians, the use of paramedics, preventive care, and outpatient care. Examines the rising cost of health care and analyzes appropriate public policy responses.

SV 356 Corporate Finance 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Introduces managerial finance. Examines the valuation of assets, the cost of capital, capital structure, working capital management, planning and budgeting, and long-term financing.

SV 357 Labor Economics 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Analyzes labor markets with theoretical, empirical, and policy applications. Explains the determination of employment and wages. Studies compensating wage differentials, labor market discrimination, labor unions and theories of unemployment.

SV 369 British Politics and Government 4R-OL-4C
Examines the historical development, ideology, culture, political processes, institutions, and public policy of the political system of the United Kingdom.

SV 373 Gender Issues 4R-OL-4C
Examines male-female differences in behavior, personality, emotion, and cognition. Examines how men and women differ as they pursue the goals of life and the degree to which these differences are innate or learned.

SV 375 Personality Theories 4R-OL-4C
Presents an organized summary of major contemporary theories of personality. Compares and contrasts theories of human behavior. Analyzes the degree that behavior is purposive, unconscious, instinctive, learned, modifiable, and predictable.

SV 382 Anthropology of Religion 4R-OL-4C
Examines various concepts and practices pertaining to the supernatural, focusing primarily on indigenous religions around the world. Discusses the relationships of religious beliefs, values, and practices with social organization, economic behavior, subsistence systems, and technology

SV 385 Archaeology & Prehistory 4R-OL-4C
Examines the human past through the analysis of cultural artifacts: the course focuses on the methods and techniques of archaeology and the study of the major cultural and social transformations from foraging to agricultural and complex civilizations.

SV 386 Human Evolution  4R-OL-4C
Examines human origins and ongoing evolution: examines the evidence of the fossil record and genes, compares human behavior with other primates, considers physical basis for behaviors, and the extent and causes of human physical diversity..

SV 413 Contemporary Germany 4R-OL-4C
Introduces historical, political, and cultural issues in German society from 1945 to the present. Compares German to European developments. Same as GE413.

SV 450 Econometrics 4R-OL-4C Pre: SV 151
Applies statistical methods to problems of economic analysis. Stresses the use of regression analysis in economic research and discusses the special problems encountered in empirical investigation of economic phenomena. In addition to SL 151, the student should have some knowledge of statistics.

SV 463 Seminar on America's Future 4R-OL-4C
Examines the key political, economic, and security challenges facing the United States in a changing global environment.

Communication

RH 131 Rhetoric and Composition 4R-OL-4C
Emphasizes rhetorical analysis of texts and images, research methods, and the conventions of academic writing, including argumentation.

RH 330 Technical and Professional Communication 4R-OL-4C Pre: RH 131
Provides students with instruction and practice in analyzing contexts, audiences, and genres; crafting documents to meet the demands and constraints of professional situations; integrating all stages of the writing process; and collaborating effectively within and across teams.

Special Topics and Directed Study

GS, IA or SV 399 – Special Topics 4R-OL-4C Arranged 
Examines a selected topic in one of the HSS disciplines in depth. A particular offering may require a prerequisite or consent of the instructor.

GS, IA or SV 499 – Directed Study 4R-OL-4C Arranged Pre: Consent of the Instructor and HSS Department Head 
Allows for individual study of an HSS topic selected by the instructor and the student(s). A plan of study, regular meetings with the instructor, and a major term project are required.

XX 456 Seminar for Economics Majors 2R-OL-2C F
Reviews research methods employed in economics, surveys selected topics and methods in current economic research, directs student toward approval of a senior project proposal.Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing while pursuing a major or double major in economics, or permission of instructor. Required of all Economics majors and double majors.

XX 457: Directed Study for Economics Senior Project 2R-OL-2C W, S Pre: XX 456
Directed study leading to completion of a senor project that demonstrates the ability to pursue independent intellectual inquiry. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing wile pursuing a major or double major in economics, or permission of instructor; successful completion of XX456. Required of all Economics majors and double majors.

Modern Languages

(NOTE: Students may not earn foreign language credit in their native tongue)

GE 111/112/113 German Language and Culture I/II/III 4R-OL-4C F/W/S Pre: Preceding course or placement by examination. 
Provides elementary training in hearing, speaking, reading, and writing German. Uses reading exercises to show the relationship between language and culture. Required language laboratory.

JP 111/112/113 Japanese Language and Culture I/II/III 4R-OL-4C F/W/S Pre: Preceding course or placement by examination. 
Provide elementary training in speaking, listening, reading and writing Japanese. Three types of characters, Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji will be introduced as well as fundamental linguistic forms and functions of modern Japanese.

SP 111/112/113 Spanish Language and Culture I/II/III 4R-OL-4C F/W/S Pre: Preceding course or placement by examination. 
Provides elementary and intermediate training in oral/aural skills, reading, and writing Spanish. Enhances grammar presentations by means of appropriate readings that show the relationship between language and culture.

GE 211/212/213 German Language and Culture IV/V/VI 4R-OL-4C F/W/S Pre: Preceding course or placement by examination. 
Reviews German grammar, emphasizing its logical sub-structure. Stresses analysis of complex sentences of scholarly German. Introduces the student to selected topics dealing with life in Germany as contrasted with life in the U.S. Provides continued practice in reading and speaking. Required language laboratory.

JP 211/212/213 Japanese Language and Culture IV/V/VI 4R-OL-4C F/W/S Pre: Preceding course or placement by examination. 
Provides further training in speaking, listening, reading and writing Japanese. More advanced aspects of modern Japanese such as honorific and humble forms, empathic expressions, casual speech, and male and female speech are examined.

SP 211/212 Spanish Language and Culture IV/V 4R-OL-4C F/W Pre: Preceding course or placement by examination 
Stresses conversational skills and intensive first year grammar review. Intermediate reading and discussion of texts on contemporary issues and cultural topics from Latin America and Spain.

SP 213 Spanish for Engineers 4R-OL-4C S Pre: SP 212 or placement by examination 
Stresses language skills useful for the engineering profession. Provides training in advanced reading, writing and conversation with emphasis on the use of language in a professional context.

GE 311 Issues in German Culture I 4R-OL-4C F Pre: GE 213 
Examines a variety of historical and contemporary issues in German popular and high culture. Same as IA 311.

GE 312 Reading German Texts 4R-OL-4C W Pre: GE 311
Studies and practices effective reading of German texts. Analyzes and evaluates their contents in discussions and the writings of short German essays.

GE 313 Advanced Grammar and Translation Methods 4R-OL-4C S Pre: GE 312
Introduces advanced grammar concepts targeted for translation of German texts. Familiarizes students with translation techniques for a variety of text types.

JP 311/312/313 Japanese Language and Culture VII/VIII/IX (Through Study Abroad Program) 4R-XL-4C Summer Pre: Preceding course 
Further develops reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students learn technical terms by participating in engineering laboratory with Japanese students. Includes cultural field trips and company visits. [This course is offered as a summer program at Kanazawa Institute of Technology.]

GE 411 Technical Translation 4R-OL-4C F Pre: GE 313
Introduces scientific and technological vocabulary; continues working with complex grammatical structures; applies methods of translation using scientific and technical texts. Requires the writing of a major technical translation project.

GE 412 Topics in German Culture II 4R-OL-4C W Pre: GE 411 
Explores topics in German and European intellectual history as represented in literature, essay, and film.  Same as GS 412.

GE 413 Contemporary Germany S Pre: GE 412 
Introduces historical, political, and cultural issues in German society from 1945 to the present. Compares German to European developments. Taught in English and open to all students. Same as SV 413.

JP 411/412/413 Japanese Language and Culture X/XI/XII (Through Study Abroad Program) 4R-XL-4C Summer Pre: Preceding course 
Develops advanced language communications skills. Presents further cultural aspects of contemporary Japanese. Introduces reading and writing of scientific Japanese. [This course is offered as a summer program at Kanazawa Institute of Technology.]

FL 299 Summer Language Study Abroad
Maximum Credit per Summer: 12. May be repeated. Credit for approved summer foreign language study abroad. May count towards a departmental minor, with the exception of a foreign language minor. Prior approval by the HSS Department Head and evidence of satisfactory completion required

HSS Majors

International Studies Major (IS) (second major only)

In the 21st century, technical work occurs increasingly in an international and multi-lingual arena. The International Studies major provides Rose-Hulman students with the opportunity to complement their primary major with a second major that prepares them for an interdependent, multicultural, and transnational world. Courses in the major focus on economic, cultural, and social processes that take place among nations and world regions. Topics may include globalization, post-colonialism, communication, migration, and environmental change.

Learning Outcomes:

  1.  Recognition of cultural diversity requires the comparison and analysis of historical, cultural, political, social, or regional differences.
    1. Analyze a socio-cultural artifact, event, or system of a society different from your own.
    2. Compare socio-cultural artifacts or systems in two or more cultures/world regions/civilizations
    3. Carry out a project involving meaningful contact with students, colleagues, clients, or sponsors abroad.
  2. Transnational and global awareness requires an understanding of the ideas, systems, processes, or trends that have created a globally interdependent world.
    1. Explain the global causes or effects of an action or decision by nation-states, corporations, groups of people, or other actors
    2. Argue for a course of action—political, economic, or otherwise—when given an international situation/case study
  3. Independent Study of global issues requires the application of appropriate analytic vocabulary, methodologies, or critical frameworks from the Humanities or the Social Sciences

    1. Assemble and evaluate resources for research in international studies.
    2. Design and carry out a research project analyzing a significant international or global issue, system, process, or event.

Requirements for a second major in International Studies (60 cred.)

  • Students double majoring in International Studies may use their International Studies courses to satisfy HSS graduation requirements.li>
  • Courses counted for the International Studies major may not be counted for HSS minors—except that foreign language courses may be used to fulfill foreign language requirements in one additional minor.
  • Students wishing to pursue a double major in Economics and International Studies may not choose the IPE area of concentration.
  • All International Studies majors are subject to approval by HSS Department Head and the Institute Curriculum Committee.

I. International Studies Core (24 cred.)

IA245 World Literatures
GS163 International Relations
GS285 Humans and Culture
GS291 World Geography
SV151 Principles of Economics
SV220 World History

II. Area of Concentration (20 cred.)

Students choose 5 courses from one of three areas of concentration: (a) International Political Economy; (b) Comparative Cultures; or (c) Individualized IS Major.

  1. International Political Economy: This concentration emphasizes the political, economic, geographic, and historical analysis of international relations.

Students must choose at least three courses from the general list and a total of five courses from both lists. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the IS advisor.

General list
IA353 History of Economic Thought
GS322 Industrial Revolution in a Global Context
GS350 International Trade and Globalization
GS351 International Finance
GS352 Economic Growth and Development
GS361 Politics of the Global Economy
SV328 Comparative Business History
SV354 Environmental Economics
Regional list
GS128 Introduction to East Asia
GS161 Comparative Politics
GS222 Modern Latin America
GS366 European Union
GS363 European Politics and Government
GS399 Geography of the Middle East
GS492 Geography of Africa

Reminder: Students wishing to pursue a double major in Economics and International Studies may not choose the IPE area of concentration.

  1. Comparative Cultures: This concentration emphasizes the comparative study of institutions and traditions across and within nations and geographic regions.

Students must choose three courses from the general list and two from the regional list to ensure both breadth of analysis and depth of content. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the IS advisor.

General list
GS322 Industrial Revolution in Global Context
GS333 Travel in World Literature
GS334 Global Novel in the 20th Century
GS432 Literature of the Global Economy
GS462 Postcolonial Literature
SV191 Cultural Geography
SV201 Religion and Ecology
SV226 The West in the East
SV382 Anthropology of Religion
Regional list (including but not limited to the following courses)
IA311 Topics in German Culture I
GS128 Introduction to East Asia
GS207 Asian Religions and Philosophy
GS222 Modern Latin America
GS313 Contemporary Spain
GS327 Modern China
GS335 Arabic Literature
GS379 Japanese Culture
GS391 Contemporary Europe
GS442 Art History: Renaissance to Modern
GS492 Geography of Africa
  1. Individualized Major: Focus and composition of this concentration are to be designed by the student and approved by IS advisor and Department Head. It is the student’s responsibility to present a coherent program of study focused on the international relations between peoples and cultures in the contemporary world.

Students must take a total of five courses.

III. One full year of a foreign language (e.g., German, Japanese, Spanish) (12 cred.)

IV. GS 499 Capstone Project in International Studies (4 cred.)

Guided study, research, and analytical writing on a topic in international studies, integrating knowledge gained from international experience and/or from course work in the major.

HSS Minors

Minor in Anthropology

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in Anthropology has the following requirements:

  1. Five courses in Anthropology.
    1. The following three courses are required:
      • GS 285 Humans & Culture
      • SV 385 Archaeology & Prehistory
      • SV 386 Human Evolution
  2. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  3. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Advisor

Courses

  • GS 384 Japanese Society
  • SV 382 Anthropology of Religion
  • XX 399 Special Topics
  • XX 499 Directed Study

Minor in Art

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor.  Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Area Minor in Art has the following requirements:

  1. Five Courses in Art:
    1. The following three courses are required:
      • IA142 Drawing
      • IA148 Beginning Photography
      • SV242 Visual Arts in Civilization
  2. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  3. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Advisor

Courses

  • GS 442 Art History:  Renaissance to Modern
  • IA 142 Drawing
  • IA 148 Beginning Photography
  • IA 244 Design and Color     
  • SV 242 Visual Arts in Civilization

Minor in East Asian Studies

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in East Asian Studies has the following requirements:

  1. Three courses (or proficiency) in Japanese Language. (Language courses may be allocated in any of the three thematic categories, but there may be no more than one language course in any category.)
  2. Four courses selected from the following:
    • GS 128 Introduction to East Asian History
    • GS 207 Asian Religions and Philosophy
    • GS 324 Gender and Work in China
    • GS 327 Modern China
    • GS 384 Japanese Society
    • SV 226 The West in the East
    • SV 326 Overseas Chinese
  3. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  4. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Adviser.

Minor in Economics

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in Economics has the following requirements:

1. Five courses in Economics, distributed as follows:

  1. Principles of Economics (SV 151);
  2. Intermediate Microeconomics (IA 350) or Intermediate Macroeconomics (IA 351);
  3. Three additional Economics courses chosen by the student and approved by an Economics Minor Advisor. These shall be selected to provide some depth in the student’s understanding of   economic analysis and its applications;

2. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.

3. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Adviser

Courses

  • GS 350 International Trade and Globalization
  • GS 351 International Finance
  • GS 352 Economic Growth and Development
  • IA 350  Intermediate Microeconomics
  • IA 351  Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • IA 352 Game Theory
  • IA 353 History of Economic Thought
  • IA 450 Mathematical Economics
  • IA 453 The Entrepreneur
  • SV 151 Principles of Economics
  • SV 350 Managerial Accounting
  • SV 351 Managerial Economics
  • SV 352 Money and Banking
  • SV 353 Industrial Organization
  • SV 354 Environmental Economics
  • SV 355 Health Economics
  • SV 356  Corporate Finance
  • SV 357 Labor Economics
  • SV 450  Econometrics
  • XX 399 Special Topics
  • XX 499 Directed Study

Minor in European Studies

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in European Studies has the following requirements:

  1. Three courses (or proficiency) in either German or Spanish. (Language courses may be allocated in any of the four thematic categories, but there may be no more than one language course in any category.)
  2. Four courses selected from the following:
    • GS 313 Contemporary Spain
    • GS 337 Shakespeare’s Europe
    • GS 363 European Politics and Government
    • GS 366 The European Union
    • GS 431 Literary London
    • GS 469 Contemporary British Fiction and Film
    • GS 491 Geography of Europe
    • IA 311 Topics in German Culture I
    • IA 337 European Romanticism
    • SV 222 Western Civilization to 1500
    • SV 223 Western Civilization from 1500 to the Present
    • SV 291 Medieval Europe
    • SV 413 Contemporary Germany
    • XX 399 Special Topics
    • XX 499 Directed Study
  3. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  4. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Adviser.

Minor in Geography

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in Geography has the following requirements:

  1. Five courses in Geography, one of which must be either World Regional Geography (GS291) or Cultural Geography (SV191).
  2. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  3. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Advisor.

Courses

  • GS 191 Geography of Middle East
  • GS 222 Modern Latin America
  • GS 291 World Geography
  • GS 327 Modern China
  • GS 391 Contemporary Europe
  • GS 491 Geography of Europe
  • GS 492 Geography of Africa
  • SV 191 Cultural Geography
  • SV 291 Medieval Europe
  • XX 399 Special Topics 
  • XX 499 Directed Study

Minor in History

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in History has the following requirements:

  1. Five courses in History
  2. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  3. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Adviser.

Courses

  • GS 128 Introduction to East Asian History
  • GS 221 Colonial Latin America
  • GS 223 World History
  • GS 222 Modern Latin America
  • GS 324 Gender and Work in China
  • GS 327 Modern China
  • GS 422 Industrial Revolution in Global Context
  • IA 388 Chinese Nationalism
  • SV 222 Western Civilization to 1500
  • SV 223 Western Civilization since 1500
  • SV 226 The West in the East
  • SV 322 Disasters and Modern Society since 1700
  • SV 326 Overseas Chinese
  • SV 328 Comparative Business History
  • SV 329 Cities in Latin American History
  • XX 399 Special Topics 
  • XX 499 Directed Readings

Minor in Language and Literature

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in Language and Literature has the following requirements:

  1. In addition to RH 131 and HS330, five courses in Language and Literature.
  2. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  3. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Adviser.

Courses

  • GS 237 Science Fiction
  • GS 334 Travel in World Literature
  • GS 335 The Global Novel in the Twentieth Century
  • GS 336 Literature of War
  • GS 337 Shakespeare's Europe
  • GS 338 Contemporary Arabic Literature in Translation
  • GS 412 Topics in German Culture II
  • GS 431 Literary London
  • GS 432 Literature and Film of the Global Economy
  • GS 462 Postcolonial Literature
  • GS 469 Contemporary British Fiction and Film
  • IA 230 Fundamentals of Public Speaking
  • IA 231 Introduction to Poetry
  • IA 232 African American Music in American Literature
  • IA 234 Major American Writers
  • IA 236 Jane Austen and the Rhetoric of Fiction
  • IA 237 Introduction to Drama
  • IA 238 African American Literature
  • IA 239 Rhetoric of Science
  • IA 240 Introduction to Shakespeare
  • IA 241 Introduction to Film Studies
  • IA 330 Documentary Film
  • IA 331 American Modernism
  • IA 333 Representations and Redefinitions of Reality
  • IA 334 Creative Writing
  • IA 335 Bible as Literature
  • IA 336 Mystery & Horror Literature
  • IA 337 European Romanticism
  • IA 339 Rebellion in American Literature
  • IA 431 History of the American Novel
  • IA 436 Reinterpretations of Literary Themes
  • SV 134 Popular Literature
  • SV 231 Introduction to Short Fiction
  • SV 232 Introduction to Non-Fiction
  • SV 233 Survey of American Literature
  • SV 332 Masculinity and Work in Fiction and Film
  • SV 334 Utopian Thought and Literature
  • SV 336 Contemporary American Fiction
  • SV 337 20th century American Novel
  • SV 339 Literature and the Environment
  • SV 234 The American Dream
  • XX 399 Special Topics 
    XX 499 Directed Study

MINOR IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 
Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in Latin American Studies has the following requirements:

  1. Three courses (or proficiency) in Spanish Language. (Language courses may be allocated in any of the three thematic categories, but there may be no more than one language course in any category.)
  2. Four courses selected from the following:
    • GS 221 Colonial Latin America
    • GS 222 Modern Latin America
    • GS 323 The Andean Countries of South America
    • GS 313 Contemporary Spain
    • IA 332 Don Quixote
    • SV 329 Cities in Latin American History
    • SV 338  Latin American Fiction: The Boom and Beyond
    • XX 399 Special Topics 
      XX 499 Directed Topics
  3. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  4. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Adviser.

Minor in Modern Languages (German, Japanese, and Spanish)

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in Modern Languages has the following requirements:

  1. Six successive courses, or the equivalent, in German, Japanese or Spanish.
  2. RH 131 and 3  HSS courses, one in each category.
  3. This means a minimum of 44 credits in HSS courses must be earned.
  4. Students may not earn foreign language credit in their native languages.

First Year Courses

GE 111/112/113 German Language and Culture I/II/III JP 111/112/113 Japanese Language and Culture I/II/III SP 111/112/113 Spanish Language and Culture I/II/III

Second Year Courses

GE 211/212/213 German Language and Culture IV/V/VI JP 211/212/213 Japanese Language and Culture IV/V/VI SP 211/212/213 Spanish Language and Culture IV/V/VI

Third Year Courses

GE 311 Topics in German Culture I/ GE312 Reading German Texts/313 Advanced Grammar and Translation Methods/ JP 311/312/313 Japanese Language and Culture VII/VIII/IX

Fourth Year Courses

GE 411 Technical Translation/412 Topics in German Culture II/413 Contemporary Germany/ JP 411/412/413 Japanese Language and Culture X/XI/XII

XX 399 Special Topics

XX 499 Directed Study

Notes:

Credits earned in a first-year, first-term language do not count in satisfying HSS graduation requirements unless the second course in the sequence is also completed successfully.

Students who have completed high school courses in German, Japanese or Spanish can get credit-by-examination for their knowledge by completing subsequent advanced level courses.

Minor in Music

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the Minor Advisor.

The Minor in Music has the following requirements:

  1. A minimum of 40 credits must be earned to obtain the minor. 36 of these credits must be in HSS courses. The remaining four (4) credits may be in an approved course from outside the HSS Department.
  2. The following four courses are required:
    • SV244 Music History: Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque
    • SV245 Music History: Classical, Romantic, Modern
    • IA246 Music Theory I: Concepts
    • IA346 Music Theory II: Applications
  3. To fulfill the fifth course requirement for the Area Minor in Music, the candidate may choose ONE of the following options:
    1. A course from outside the HSS Department, approved by the Minor Advisor, such as:
      • ECE481 Electronic Music Synthesis
      • PH404 Acoustics
      • PH460 Directed Study (music-related)
  4. IA 499: Directed Study in Music. Pre-requisite: consent of the Minor Advisor.
  5. IA 348: Music Performance. Pre-requisite: consent of the Minor Advisor.
  6. Four (4) credits of Satisfactory participation in one or more of the formal Performing Groups (Concert Band, Jazz Ensemble, String Ensemble, and Chorus) are required. Performance credit may not be transferred from another college. One academic term of satisfactory participation earns one credit. The four required credits need not be completed consecutively, nor must they all be completed in the same performing group. The specific criteria for “satisfactory participation” will be provided to the candidate by the Minor Advisor.

Minor in Philosophy and Religion

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in Philosophy and Religion has the following requirements:

  1. Five courses in Philosophy and Religion, one of which must be Introduction to Philosophy (IA 101).
  2. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  3. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Adviser.

Courses

  • GS 207 Asian Religions and Philosophy
  • IA 101 Introduction to Philosophy
  • IA 302 Philosophy of Religion
  • IA 335 Bible as Literature
  • SV201 Religion and Ecology
  • SV 303 Business and Engineering Ethics
  • SV 304 Bioethics
  • SV 382 Anthropology of Religion
  • XX 399 Special Topics
  • XX 499 Directed Study

Minor in Political Science

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in Political Science has the following requirements:

  1. Five courses in Political Science, one of which must be Comparative Politics (GS 161), International Relations (GS 163), or American Politics and Government (SV 166)
  2. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  3. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Adviser.

Courses

  • GS 161 Comparative Politics
  • GS 163 International Relations
  • GS 361 Politics of the Global Economy
  • GS 366 The European Union
  • 363 European Politics and Government
  • SV 166 American Politics and Government
  • SV 369 British Politics and Government
  • SV 463 Seminar on America's Future
  • XX 399 Special Topics
  • XX 499 Directed Study

Minor in Psychology

Students may apply only one (1) transfer course toward a minor. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the minor advisor.

The Minor in Psychology has the following requirements:

  1. Five courses in Psychology, distributed as follows:
    • Principles of Psychology (SV 171).
    • Experimental Psychology (SV 272).
    • Three other Psychology courses.
  2. Engineering Statistics I (MA 223) or Introduction to Probability and Statistics with Applications (MA 381).
  3. A minimum of 40 credits in HSS courses must be earned to obtain the minor.
  4. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the Minor Adviser.

Courses

  • IA 471 Literature of Madness
  • SV 171 Principles of Psychology
  • SV 272 Experimental Psychology
  • SV 375 Personality Theories
  • SV 373 Gender Issues
  • XX 399 Special Topics 
  • XX 499 Directed Study

German Technical Translator's Certificate Program

A student may earn, in addition to one of the regular degree programs in science or engineering, a certificate of proficiency in German technical translation. Successful completion of this non-degree program partially fulfills the graduation requirements in humanities and social sciences.

Certificate Requirements

A student must have a 3.0 in the first two years of German and in his/her major, as well as permission of the instructor, to enter the third year language courses. Exceptions may be made by the instructor in charge of the program.

  1. A student must complete all the technical courses required by one of the Institute’s degree-granting programs.
  2. A student must successfully complete the third and fourth year courses of the German Studies program (GE 311/312/313 and GE 411/412/413).
  3. A student who successfully completes the four-year language program is exempted from RH 131 Rhetoric and Composition, and from both courses in Global Studies (GS). This generally means that the student will only need to take three HSS courses other than German, one additional course in any category.  

Commentary

A student who qualifies through the Foreign Language Examination administered at Rose-Hulman during Freshman orientation week, will be permitted to enroll in the appropriate level of German as determined by the foreign language faculty. A student who successfully completes a quarter of more advanced language at Rose-Hulman with a grade of C or better will be granted 4 hours of Credit by Examination for each quarter of language by-passed. (Note: a minimum of two terms of college language must be completed in order to receive HSS graduation credit.)

  1. A student who is in the German Studies Program in Culture and Technology is not required to take RH 131, Rhetoric and Composition.
  2. In order to obtain the Translator’s Certificate, some students in some curricula may have to take more than the minimum number of credits required for graduation.
  3. Due to scheduling requirements of some regular degree programs, a student may also have to carry an overload in some terms. This means that the student will have to maintain a better-than-average grade point average to meet the Institute requirements permitting an overload. See the Student Handbook for details.
  4. A student is strongly urged, but not required, to spend at least one summer studying in an approved program for foreigners in Germany. Some small grants may be available to help defray expenses.