ROSE-HULMAN INSTITUTE OF TEHCNOLOGY

ES201: Conservation and Accounting Principles Schedule – Winter 2013-2014

-- The instructors reserve the right to make changes to this schedule as the quarter progresses.

-- Reading and HW assignments will typically be finalized a couple of days before they appear in the schedule. Material in italic, gray type has not been finalized.

-- PLEASE check revision date-time stamp to see when last update was made.

Revision Date-Time            ΰΰΰ                2/13/2014 9:57 AM

Class

Date

Day

Lesson Objectives

Reading
(Complete Before Class)

Found in class textbook

HW

(Complete After Class)

Found in class textbook

Class when HW Due

1

12-02

M

Introduction (1)

-       Explain course administrative policies, e.g. development and evaluation activities, homework guidelines, etc.

-       Discuss place of ES201 in SEC.

-       Discuss engineering vs. science, engineering science vs. science; engineering analysis vs. engineering design.

-       Discuss Systems, Accounting, and Modeling Process. Demonstrate how it's natural to construct a model: select a system, count something (accounting principle), and make modeling assumptions. Illustrate usefulness of symbolic solution.

- - - -  

Set 1 - No HW

4

2

12-03

T

Basic Concepts  (1)

-       Answer questions about Chap 2. Tough and abstract chapter that will be revisited many times. Just introduce key concepts, e.g. use example to introduce SAM Concepts: fundamental laws & accounting principles: system, properties, process, accounting concept (storage, transport, and generation), and conservation.

-       Review units and dimensions, esp. use in calculations and unit conversions.

-       Explore difference between mass (kg, lbm, slug) and weight (N,lbf): W=mg.

Preface

Chapter 1 & 2

Appendices A & B

Set 2 - In Appendix B

Problem B.4 only Part (a)

Problem B.6 

3

12-05

R

Mass (1)   [Mass in a system]

-       Develop Conservation of Mass via “Four Questions“

-       Measures:  density and specific volume, specific weight, specific gravity

-       Constitutive equations, e.g.  Ideal Gas Model (a substance model relating P, v, and T for a gas)

-       Calculate the mass in a system using density and system geometry.

3.1, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8

FYI  3.1 = Section 1 in Chapter 3

Set 3 -

HW Set 3 (Download)

6

4

12-06

F

Mass (2)  [Mass flow rate at a boundary]

-       Calculate the mass flow rate given the velocity profile: important assumptions.

3.2

Set 4 -

Problem 3.4 Part (a)

Problem 3.5

5

12-09

M

Mass (3) [Closed deformable systems]

3.3

Set 5 -

Problem 5.1 (Download)

Problem 3.10 (text)

8

6

12-10

T

Mass (4) [Open, steady-state systems]

Set 6 -

Problems 3. 28 & 3.31 (text)

7

12-12

R

Mass (5) [Unsteady applications, moving systems]

 

Set 7 -

Problems 3.2 & 3.34 (text)

10

8

12-13

F

Mass (6)

-       More examples

Set 8 -

Problems 3.35 & 3.37 (text)

9

12-16

M

Linear Momentum (1)

-       Introduce Conservation of Linear Momentum via “Four Questions“

-       Work example to illustrate: use of free-body diagrams; particle kinematics; open/closed systems

5.1

Set 9 – Due Thursday

HW Set 9 corrected (Download)

11

10

12-17

T

Linear Momentum (2)

-       Closed systems

-       Kinematics: Relation between Position, Velocity,& Acceleration

5.2 - Examples

"What a serve"

"Cable car"

Set 10 - Due Tuesday

HW Set 10 (Download)

14

11

12-19

R

Linear Momentum (3)

-       Pressure forces

-       Steady-state open systems

5.2 - Examples

"Forces on a nozzle"

"Weighing Water"

Set 11 - Due Tuesday

Problem 5.37

12

12-20

F

TEST 1: Introduction, Basic Concepts & Conservation of Mass

--------

Set 12 (none)

 

 

 

 

Holiday Vacation

 

 

 

13

01-06

M

Class cancelled

Set 13 - None

16

14

01-07

T

Class cancelled

Set 14 - None

15

01-09

R

Linear Momentum (4)

-        Work examples (open and closed systems)

-       Relative motion

Review Sections 5.1 & 5.2

Set 15 - Due Tuesday Problems 5. 4 & 5.6**

**Looking for net Rx & Ry applied by the bolts to elbow

18

 

16

01-10

F

Linear Momentum (5)

-       Friction forces: static vs. kinetic friction

-       Work Examples

5.3

Set 16 – Due Tuesday

Lui's Sections

ΰ HW Set 16

Richards' Sections

ΰ Problems 5.9 & 5.17

17

01-13

M

Linear Momentum (7)

-       Impact: impulse and impulsive forces

-        Relative motion

5.4

Pg. 5-7 to 8; Pg. 5-48 to 51

Set 17 - Due Friday

Problem 5.19, 5.20

20

18

01-14

T

Linear Momentum (8)

-        Work Examples

Set 18 – Due Friday

Problem 5.40, 5.44 

19

01-16

R

Angular Momentum (1)

-       Moment of a force as a vector cross-product. Use of vector decomposition into normal and parallel components to find cross product in two dimensions.

-       Discuss the moment of a force including a force couple.

Discuss the basic definition of angular momentum for a particle

6.1 - 6.2.1

Set 19 – Due Tuesday

Problem 6.18, 6.19

22

20

01-17

F

Angular Momentum (2)

-       Develop conservation of angular momentum via “Four Questions“

Model surface force reactions: normal forces, shear forces, and moments

6.2 to 6.3 (thru page 6-21)

Set 20 - Due Tuesday

Problem 6.10, 6.27

21

01-20

M

Angular Momentum (3)

-      Steady-state and fixed-axis rotation examples (Open and closed systems)

6.3 (pp. 6-25 and 6-26)

Set 21 - Due Friday*

Problem 6.3, 6.30

*Richards Classes due Tuesday

24*

22

01-21

T

Angular Momentum (4)

-      Translation/Tipping Problems

6.3 (pp. 6-22 to 6-24)

Set 22 - Due Friday*

Problem 6.5, 6.21

*Richards Classes due Tuesday

23

01-23

R

Angular Momentum (5)

-       Examples

 

Set 23 - Due Tuesday (All)

Problem 5.23, 6.23

(Yes it is 5.23)

26

24

01-24

F

Energy (1)

-       Four Questions: (1) What is energy?; (2) How can it be stored? (Types); (3) How can it be transported? (work, heat transfer, and mass flow); (4) How can it be produced/destroyed?

-       Putting it all together --- The Big Picture

Pages in Chapter 7:

pp. 18-23, 23-25, 31-34

7.2.1  What?  pp. 18 - 21

7.2.2  Storage? pp. 21-23

7.2.3  Transport?
pp. 23-25, 31, 31-32

7.2.4 Creation/Destruction?

pp. 32-33

7.2.5 All together. pp. 33-34

Set 24 - Due Thursday

Problem 7.10, 7.11

27

25

01-27

M

Energy (2)

-       How can it be stored? Types of energy: kinetic, gravitational potential, internal, elastic (spring), other.

-       Transfer of energy by work at non-flow boundaries revisited

Compression and expansion work (PdV work)

Shaft work and power

Electric work and power

7.2.2 Storage

7.1.1 Mech work

7.2.3 non-flow work

(pp. 23-31)

Set 25 - Due Thursday

Problem 7.9

27

26

01-28

T

Energy (3)

-       Transfer of energy by work at non-flow boundaries (continued)Electrical work and power

-       Electrical power revisited:  Instantaneous and average electric power, AC Power, effective voltage and current, and steady-state systems

7.8.1-7.8.2

Set 26 - Due Tuesday

None

30

27

01-30

R

Energy (4)

-       Transfer of energy by work at flow boundaries revisited

-       Conservation of Energy and its Application

-                 modeling assumptions about the system

-                 modeling assumptions about the substance

-                 modeling assumptions about heat transfer and work           transfer of energy

7.5 Flow Work

7.3 Cons of Energy

Set 27 - Due Tuesday

Problem 7.14, 7.19

30

28

01-31

F

TEST 2 - Classes 9 - 23 (Linear & Angular Momentum)

 

Set 28 -- None

29

02-03

M

Energy (5)

-       Applications

-       Open/closed systems without substance models

7.3

Steady-state Devices Handout (if not distributed in class click link to open file)

Set 29 - Due Friday

7.32, 7.33 (a&b)

32

30

02-04

T

Energy (6)

-       Substance models: ideal gas and incompressible substance models

-       Applications with ideal gas and incompressible substance models

7.4

Set 30 - Due Friday

7.51, 7.54

32

31

02-06

R

Energy (7)

-       Applications with incompressible substance and ideal gas models

-       Heat transfer mechanisms, especially convection heat transfer

7.7

Set 31 - Due Tuesday

Problem 7.70, 7.71

34

32

02-07

F

Energy (8)

-       Mechanical Energy Balance (Restricted application of Conservation of Energy)

-       Mechanical Energy stored in a Spring

-       Applications

-       Typical MEB examples

Mechanical Energy Balance Notes

7.1.2-7.1.4

Set 32 - Due Tuesday

Problem 7.42, 7.76 7.6

34

33

02-10

M

Energy (9)

-        

-----

Set 33 - Due Thursday

Problem 7.48

35

34

02-11

T

Energy (10)

-        

Set 34

None

35

02-13

R

Energy (11)

-       Thermodynamic cycles

-       Measures of cycle performance

7.9

Cycle example after 7.9 in text

Set 35 - Due Tuesday

Problem 7.38, 7.40

38

36

02-14

F

-       Test 3 (Lectures 24 - 34)  No cycles on this exam

 

None

37

02-17

M

Entropy (1)

-       Everyday experiences with the spontaneous processes

-       Second Law of Thermodynamics

-       Accounting Principle for Entropy

-       Empirical temperature vs. thermodynamic temperature scales

7.6; 8.1-8.3

Set 37 - Not collected

 

38

02-18

T

Entropy (2)

Cycle performance:  “What’s the ‘best’ cycle?”

Substances models ΰ calculating entropy changes

Substance models

8.4 -8.5

Set 38 - Not collected

39

02-20

R

Entropy (3)

8.4

Set 39 - Not collected

40

02-21

F

Entropy (4)

8.5

Set 40 - Not collected

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FINAL EXAM Week